According to the latest estimates from the U.S. Bureau of Economic Analysis, the Michigan economy grew by 1.9% in 2014 when compared with 2013 to an inflation-adjusted level of $417.3 billion. The sectors that realized the biggest gains on a percentage basis were private-service-related industries, including professional and business services, which saw the biggest real dollar increase of $2.3 billion, or 4.3%. However, manufacturing saw the second largest gain in real dollar value, increasing by $2.0 billion in 2014 from 2013. Other industry sectors that realized significant gains were information (3.6%), trade, transportation, and utilities (2.4%), and education and health services (2.0%).

It also looks as if Michigan’s economic expansion is poised to continue through 2015. Based on the most recent release of the Federal Reserve Bank of Chicago’s Midwest Economy Index (MEI), Michigan’s contribution to the economic growth of the Seventh Federal Reserve District decreased only slightly in June to 0.19; moreover, the June 2015 annual year-to-date average of 0.18 exceeds every annual average dating back to 1994. The MEI is a weighted average of 129 state and regional indicators for the five states of the Seventh District (Illinois, Indiana, Iowa, Michigan and Wisconsin). The index is designed to measure nonfarm business activity by tracking four broad sectors of economic activity: manufacturing, construction and mining, services, and consumer spending. A value of zero for the MEI indicates the Midwest economy is growing at its long-term trend rate of growth, while a positive number indicates above-average expansion and a negative number suggests below-average growth. Michigan’s contribution to the MEI of 0.19 for June would suggest that Michigan’s economy is performing better than its long-run average.

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