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Great Lakes Coffee

In downtown Detroit, the same spirit of renewal that turned abandoned factories into artist studios is feeding another micromovement centered around food. The city’s small group of pioneer chefs has spawned a flurry of exciting new restaurants, with microdistilleries and urban farms following close behind. And, next year, this gastronome revolution goes mainstream (haters might say lamestream) when Motown gets its first Whole Foods.

Stoking and sometimes poking fun at the city’s kinetic culinary scene is Gourmet Underground Detroit, a troop of foodies led by two restaurant critics, Evan Hansen and Todd Abrams. They host picnics and potlucks, blog about restaurant openings and school disciples in how to home-brew kombucha. The group has its sassy side, taking pleasure in mocking Yelp reviewers and trashing Michigan’s favorite seasonal ale, Oberon. “We can be contrarian, edgy,” Hansen says.

In choosing their favorite new places below, Hansen and Abrams list not only where to eat in Detroit, but often when, explaining that — between pop-up canteens, food truck meet-ups and seasonal markets — some of the city’s best food is here today, gone tomorrow.

Komodo Kitchen Hansen and Abrams say this once-a-month roving Asian-fusion supper club stands out from the glut of similar setups with subtle aromatics and striking flavors. It’s hosted by a trio of restaurant vets, one of whom hails from Indonesia. komodokitchen.com.

Green Dot Stables The underground gourmands appreciate the $3-per-item menu concept here — mostly sliders but also kale salad, poutine and lots of other delectable small bites. 2200 West Lafayette Boulevard; (313) 962-5588; greendotstables.com.

Schnäck This once-a-month German-food pop-up, run out of the cramped Supino pizzeria, delights in pork, pretzels and beer. 2457 Russell Street; facebook.com/schnackdetroit.

Great Lakes Coffee Shop Opened in July by a local microroaster, this coffee bar serves not only coffee but also inexpensive, atypical and small-scale-production wines. 3965 Woodward Avenue; (313) 831-9627; greatlakescoffee.com.

Tashmoo Biergarten. This outdoor beer hall on the east side serves only Michigan brews. Hansen and Abrams suggest trying one of the oak-aged ales by Jolly Pumpkin and going now, during Oktoberfest. 1416 Van Dyke Street; (616) 862-8834; facebook.com/tashmoodetroit.

Detroit Eastern Market The historic bazaar — open since 1891 — began a seasonal, Michigan-centric Tuesday market last year that’s focused on incubating local start-ups. The city’s food trucks converge there on the last Tuesday of every month (through October). 2934 Russell Street; (313) 833-9300; detroiteasternmarket.com.

Click HERE to read the full article in the New York Times!

Two Detroit Photography Exhibits Make Their Way To D.C.

Photo: Camilo José Vergara

In the fall of 2012, the National Building Museum presents two photography exhibitions exploring the meaning of Detroit, Michigan. In Detroit Disassembled the artist Andrew Moore offers dramatic, classically-inspired images of the ruins found in the Motor City. Detroit Is No Dry Bones, by documentarian Camilo José Vergara, is a portrait of urban flux incorporating sequences of photos taken over two decades. In contrasting approaches to Detroit, Moore shows ruins returning to the earth and Vergara shows a transient city of reinvention. The exhibitions are on view in adjacent galleries from September 30, 2012 through February 18, 2013.

The spectacle of Detroit’s decay has been widely circulated by the traditional press, online, and through social media, triggering debates over what can and should be done for the city. Its post-industrial ruins and abandoned landscapes are seen by many as eyesores in need repair or redevelopment, while outside artists and urban explorers make pilgrimages to the same locations. At the same time, both old and new residents are taking a DIY approach to redefining Motown, starting new businesses, farms, and organizing for positive change. Once the largest and most important manufacturing center of the 20th century, Detroit is a complex shrinking city that has become many cities in one, or in Vergara's words "The Eternal City of the Industrial Age."

Detroit Disassembled: Photographs by Andrew Moore

Detroit Is No Dry Bones: Photographs by Camilo José Vergara

Click HERE to read the full article and learn more about the photographers!


What if the schedule of city-life had recess built into it, just like elementary school? A team of social innovators in Detroit is asking that question with their upcoming project Hopscotch Detroit, a social free-for-all that puts a schoolyard spin on community engagement—and even intends to break a world record, using nearly a ton of chalk, stencils, and city's sidewalks.

Hopscotch Detroit is a joint venture of social design startup Wedge Detroit and community-building initiative Imagine Detroit Together. Since June, the two organizations have conspired to bring a 4.2-mile-long urban hopscotch course to life. Equal parts ode to the classic childhood game and imaginative community event, Hopscotch Detroit's allure is its simplicity: temporarily transforming a street, or a city, into a unified, vibrant playground.

“Hopscotch will cause collisions among people, neighborhoods, artists, businesses, organizations, the design community, and ideas that normally don't sit side-by-side," says Hopscotch Detroit organizer Ajooni Sethi. "The game transcends generations, cultures, and neighborhoods, bringing together a whole mix of folks. That's how you get a 60-year old man from downtown Detroit and a five-year old from Osborn”—a neighborhood on the edge of town—“to share an experience.”

Hopscotch Detroit will draw its first chalk square on September 19 as part of the Detroit Design Festival and plans to debut the completed course on September 22. The course will begin in Downtown Detroit and end in Midtown. Each day of the festival, 30 volunteers will chalk up an additional mile, armed with hand-cut stencils, paint brushes, sponges, paint mixers, knee pads, and non-toxic chalk paint—a combination of flour, corn starch, sugar, water, and tempera paint that should hold up for about three rainfalls.

Click HERE to read the full article on Good.is! 
Detroit PromoPeople keep asking, “Why are you doing a Techonomy conference in Detroit?” We’re known for our invite-only annual retreat in the desert near Tucson. So why, you may wonder, is our first one-day event in a gritty, depressed, financially-troubled city that seems well past its glory?

The group that had the least trouble answering this question were our highest-profile tech speakers—Jack Dorsey, Steve Case, and Tim Draper. Once they heard we were doing a Techonomy event in Detroit they all said they wanted to be part of it—sometimes literally within seconds. With LinkedIn founder Reid Hoffman, I hadn’t even finished a sentence before he said, “I’m in.” His schedule later prevented him from coming, but he had instant enthusiasm for the idea.

What these guys who are deeply immersed in changing the world all realize is that the time is now to apply technology, innovation, and entrepreneurship to address our urgent national problems. Detroit, for the very fact that it is among the most challenging corners of our economy, is the perfect place to demonstrate the game-changing potential of these tools. I like to say that Detroit, with its infrastructure so decimated, is literally a green field—for farming (which is really happening here) or for innovation.

Techonomy Detroit, hosted by our close partners at the Detroit Economic Club, aims to shine a light on how technology can transform U.S. competitiveness, create jobs, grow our economy, and revitalize our cities.

If technology is the key ingredient to rejuvenating the American economy, it has to work where the problems are biggest and the task the hardest. Detroit has gone further down than just about any other major city. Its population is less than half what it was in its heyday. A large percentage of those who remain are extremely poor.

But we at Techonomy—and our speakers—believe we are in an era of technology breakthroughs that can enable any community to make rapid progress—if it embraces them. These tools can absolutely be applied in Detroit, or anywhere, to make a dramatic difference—faster than most recognize. That’s the message we hope to convey this coming Wednesday at the conference at Wayne State University. We see promising advances in education, health care, manufacturing, business structure and management, finance, entrepreneurship, urban planning, and yes even in transportation, Detroit’s historic strength.

Click HERE to read the full article on Forbes! 


2012 Hatch Detroit Semi-Finalists
Food
Libations
Fashion/Cosmetics
Recreational 

Click HERE to Cast Your Vote For Your Top 4 (daily)!!!!



Head on over to Whole Foods Detroit for more information! 

Belle Isle Aquarium Grand Re-Opening is This Saturday!

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