Detroit Picture Of The Day, Friday Jan. 18th

Photo via the very entertaining Jim Boyle

"No other city in America has had a business community step up and raise $100 million."- U.S. Transportation Secretary Ray Lahood, right before adding $25 million to M1 Light Rail + $6 million Toward RTA

Click HERE to read more about what this investment entails!

WXYZ

Hollywood superstar Ryan Gosling is expected to be shooting a movie in the Detroit area this spring, and you can be in it!

How to Catch a Monster is set to star Mad Men's Christina Hendricks. Gosling will be in our area to direct the movie beginning in May. The production has set up a website to cast parts in the film.

In order to apply you must go to their website. Once there follow the posted instructions to upload a video and send them your information. As of now there are three parts available, but the website says they will be making other roles available for submissions.


The state of Michigan’s official travel and tourism website, michigan.org, is once again the most visited state tourism website in the country. The site attracted more visits than any other state tourism website for the sixth year in a row, according to the independent online measurement company Experian Hitwise.

With nearly 1 million more visits than the number two state tourism website, Florida, michigan.org received 7.1 percent of the overall market share of visits to state tourism sites.

“The michigan.org website continues to be an incredibly popular and effective site to showcase Michigan’s terrific destinations and highlight the award-winning Pure Michigan campaign nationwide,” said George Zimmermann, Vice President of Travel Michigan, part of the Michigan Economic Development Corporation. “With a new design and consumer friendly features such as a trip planner tool and Trip Advisor property ratings, michigan.org helps to turn our website traffic into tourism dollars here in Michigan.”

In 2012, michigan.org recorded more than 8.8 million web visits, with consumers using the site an average of 24,000 times per day. In addition, click-throughs from the site to other Michigan tourism industry sites totaled an average of 14,000 per day and 5.3 million for the year.

Last fall, Travel Michigan launched a newly designed michigan.org with features including an interactive map, Hot Spots page and a trip planner tool. The new site utilizes responsive web design, making michigan.org one of the first state tourism websites to take advantage of this mobile-friendly technology.

Also new, Trip Advisor ratings are now available on michigan.org for many of the 15,000 Michigan tourism attractions, events, hotels, resorts on the site.

Pure Michigan’s social media efforts have also continued to lead the industry. Think Social Media recently ranked Pure Michigan’s social media presence the best in the United States among all destination marketing organizations (DMO). This is the ninth time since 2009 that Michigan has been ranked #1 in this quarterly report and it has been ranked either #1 or #2 for 14 of the past 15 quarters – the highest rankings of any state. The U.S. Travel Association awarded Michigan a 2012 Mercury Award for “Best Use of Social Media” among all state DMO’s in the nation.

Pure Michigan also holds the number one state tourism spot on Instagram with more than 15,000 followers and more than 115,000 photos using the #PureMichigan hashtag since its launch in July. Pure Michigan continues have an active and growing presence on Google+, Twitter and Pinterest as well.

Travel Michigan, part of the Michigan Economic Development Corporation, markets the state’s tourism industry and provides valuable visitor information services. For Michigan travel news and updates, go to michigan.org.

The Michigan Economic Development Corporation (MEDC) serves as the state's marketing arm and lead agency for business, talent and jobs, with a focus on helping grow Michigan's economy. For more on the MEDC and its initiatives, visit: MichiganAdvantage.org.


Buddy’s Pizza supports the Great Lakes! $6,000 donation to benefit Alliance for the Great Lakes, Belle Isle A business made famous in the Great Lakes State, Detroit original Buddy’s Pizza is ready to donate $6,000 to the independent citizen’s organization Alliance for the Great Lakes.

In June 2012, Buddy’s Pizza joined forces with the Alliance for the Great Lakes, a nonprofit devoted to protecting and restoring the Great Lakes through education, policy and citizen involvement, to unveil the Made in Michigan Great Lakes Pizza Collection which featured five pies inspired by the Great Lakes.

In addition to a variety of campaigns and initiatives set forth by the Alliance, the donation from Buddy’s will be used to benefit an innovative restoration and education project targeted at returning 72 linear feet of shoreline and coastal wetland on Belle Isle and a litter reduction campaign.

“Michigan is truly a beautiful state, and we owe so much of that beauty to our amazing lakes and bodies of water,” said Robert Jacobs, president of Buddy’s Pizza. “We’re so pleased to present the Alliance for the Great Lakes with a donation that will not only be used to better the Great Lakes, but Belle Isle, which is an iconic Detroit landmark.”

The pizza collection was created to pay tribute to the family restaurant’s Michigan heritage and dedication to everything Pure Michigan. For each pizza from the collection sold, Buddy’s president, Robert Jacobs, announced he would donate $1 to the Alliance in support of the nonprofit’s efforts in maintaining a healthy Pure Michigan environment.

Thanks to an overwhelming response from metro Detroit patrons, the collection fostered a substantial donation to benefit the nonprofit.

"In naming a pizza collection after the Great Lakes, Buddy's Pizza gave every customer a chance to protect this great regional resource -- something we at the Alliance for the Great Lakes do every day," says Joel Brammeier, Alliance president and CEO. "But we don't do it alone. When an established business like Buddy's makes the Great Lakes its priority, everyone who orders up shares in 'a piece of the pie.’"

Additionally, due to metro Detroiters overwhelming support, all five Made in Michigan Great Lakes pizzas will remain on the Buddy’s Pizza menu at all nine locations.

The pizzas are:

Lake Huron – Spinach and artichoke blend, roasted tomatoes, fresh spinach Lake Ontario – Fresh cilantro, Canadian bacon, grilled pineapple, Buddy’s BBQ sauce Lake Michigan – Ground beef, carmelized onions, blue cheese, tomato basil sauce Lake Erie – Red onion, roasted red peppers, salami, pepperoncini, tomato basil sauce Lake Superior – Fresh basil, pine nuts, pepperoni, tomato basil sauce, Buddy’s spice blend.

About Alliance for the Great Lakes Formed in 1970, the Alliance for the Great Lakes is the oldest independent Great Lakes organization in North America. Our mission is to: conserve and restore the world's largest freshwater resource using policy, education and local efforts, ensuring a healthy Great Lakes and clean water for generations of people and wildlife. More about the Alliance for the Great Lakes is online at www.greatlakes.org.

Forbes: Show Starters At The Detroit Auto Show




The North American International Auto Show press days officially begin on Mon. Jan, 14, but on the evening before the show some of the most anticipated automobiles have been revealed at private events held around the Motor City.

The talk of the town is the show-starting 2014 Corvette Stingray, pictured here in my furious effort to document history unfolding on Detroit‘s North End at the reveal. At writing, every detail and sculptural cue is being sussed out by reporters and Corvette enthusiasts who have been waiting eight years for a new model to take over the holy grail of American super cars.

Here’s the quick draw: The 2014 Corvette is in its seventh generation, hence the C-7 moniker. It was inspired by the Corvette Stingray first used by Corvette godfather Bill Mitchell in 1959, but perhaps best embodied by the 1963 Stingray, when Corvette was at the peak of it’s thrill. The C7 is powered by a front-engine V8 that makes 450 hp. And yes, most importantly to Corvette’s allure, it has a whole new exterior style. When it came to first reactions to the exterior appearance, everyone had an opinion about the tail lights the contours — for better or for worse. This is no watered-down meek Corvette. And finally, yes of course the show car is red.

Click HERE to read the full article!

The Farnsworth Community Garden in Detroit. Detroit Works recommends expanding existing neighborhood initiatives, such as community gardens.
 After nearly three years of research, members of the Detroit Works Project unveiled yesterday a host of recommendations for tackling the city’s most daunting economic, infrastructural, and social challenges. From job growth to zoning reform, the recommendations range in scale from small pilot programs to 50-year infrastructure projects. And today the Kresge Foundation and W.K. Kellogg Foundation announced that they will jointly give $3 million to fund an office dedicated to overseeing the implementation of those recommendations.

In addition, all of Kresge's grants for the city over the next five years—a minimum of $150 million—will be aligned with Detroit Works' recommendations.

Detroit has racked up a large collection of shelved master plans, but Detroit Works—an initiative launched by Mayor Dave Bing in 2010, funded primarily by private organizations, to inventory the city’s challenges and make recommendations for renewal—has taken careful steps to buck the trend. The recommendations are the result of meticulous data crunching and communicating with approximately 100,000 community members. In addition, philanthropies, as well as other public and private funders, have pledged financial support for various projects. An implementation committee will continue to advocate for the recommendations.

While accounting for the grim prediction that the city’s population will drop from roughly 700,000 to 600,000 in the next 20 years, the report emphasizes Detroit’s strengths. It calls for building up existing business districts; adaptive reuse rather than demolition for vacant industrial buildings; creating incentives for small businesses to expand; and making use of empty space in large office buildings that have shed jobs over the years. Other recommendations include developing flexible land-use codes, turning little-used roads to rubble for stormwater collection, planting forests along highways, and reconfiguring public bus schedules for higher efficiency.

Click HERE to read the full article! 
Jerry Paffendorf and Mary Lorene Carter, co-founders of the Imagination Station
Jerry Paffendorf and Mary Lorene Carter, co-founders of the Imagination Station, a nonprofit organisation renovating two blighted historic houses to help revive the city. Photograph: Brett Mountain/Eyevine

The raucous scene inside the M@ dison building is not one usually associated with inner-city Detroit.

It appears as though a wacky slice of California's Silicon Valley has landed smack in the middle of a city now just as famous for catastrophic urban blight as for being the spiritual home of America's car industry.

Two youthful tech engineers play table tennis in the middle of a busy open-plan office, while bubble chairs hang from the ceiling. Around a table three people are having an intense discussion and a snatch of their conversation drifts across the room. "Having an eye patch would be kind of cool," insists one, earnestly.

This is no mirage. Increasingly it is a common sight in the Motor City as over the last few years a flood of hi-tech firms have sprung up in downtown Detroit, sparking talk of an urban renaissance in an area laid waste by poverty and abandonment.

The M@ dison building has just been named one of the world's coolest offices by business monthly magazine Inc. The building is not alone. Around the M@ dison a cluster of tech firms, design boutiques and other web-savvy projects have emerged. In their wake have come bars, restaurants, spas and, that ultimate accolade of hip urban youth in America, an upmarket table tennis club. Most are centred on Woodward Avenue, leading to the once-proud street being dubbed "Webward Avenue" by local media.

But, unlike many previous attempts to rejuvenate downtown Detroit, the growth of a tech industry seems to have legs. Suddenly buildings empty for decades are being snapped up and turned into loft apartments. On "Webward", the sound of construction rings out as new buildings rise skywards. In Detroit, so down on its luck for so long, never underestimate the sheer joy the sound of jackhammers brings. "You are seeing construction. It is pretty exciting," said Jim Xiao, a financial analyst for Detroit Venture Partners, the driving force behind the M@ dison and an investor in new tech firms in the city.

Xiao, a 24-year-old who evaluates tech firms for DVP to finance, has trouble concealing his enthusiasm. He lives in one of the converted buildings nearby, socialises at the new downtown bars and has a keen sense of mission about tech's role in the city's future. "Where else in the country can you make an actual impact on a whole city when you are in your 20s?" he said.

As a former resident of Seattle and Microsoft employee, Xiao is typical of the breed of tech engineers and entrepreneurs popping up in Detroit. Already DVP has invested in 18 startups in under two years. The aim is to set up many of them in the M@ dison and then watch them grow, leave to find their own offices and have their spaces filled by an already long waiting list of new ones looking for a leg up. In a city known for the "big three" of General Motors, Chrysler and Ford, the corporate names around "Webward Avenue" now boldly proclaim their arrival with techie monikers such as Doodle Home, Tapjoy and Bizdom. Nor is it just in downtown that the tech industry is taking hold. In one of the furthest-flung parts of the city, Brightmoor, there are plans to set up a project called TechTown that will help locals start or improve their businesses.

One of the biggest success stories is Detroit Labs, which makes apps for mobile phones, iPads and other tablets. The firm has grown from nothing to being 30-strong in 18 months and is about to move out of the M@ dison for two floors of office space of its own. Detroit Labs co-founder Paul Glomski is another evangelist for the city. "There is the cool grit factor with Detroit. This is a genuine, hardworking place. It is not superficial. It is full of people getting things done," he said.

It is not just new firms giving birth to the hi-tech industry in Detroit. The giant car-makers are playing a role too. The industry, which is bouncing back after a government bailout during the recession, is producing cars increasingly focused on tech. As a result, the big three are hiring thousands of software engineers as vehicles become internet-connected and tech-oriented.

Click HERE to read the full article! 
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