Honor & Folly's living area offers a fully stocked kitchen for guests to use.  

The Five-Point Weekend Escape Plan
Discover Urban Renewal in Detroit

A wave of nonprofits and food-focused locals is revitalizing once-abandoned neighborhoods with urban farms, public art projects, and locavore restaurants. 
By Edna Ishayik 

Get a taste of the roaring twenties at the venerable Book Cadillac Hotel (from $169), a Westin property that debuted in 1924 and reopened in 2008 after nearly twenty years of abandonment. With 453 rooms and suites, you’ll find more space here than at other chains, and its Michael Symon-helmed restaurant Roast hosts one of the city’s better happy hours, where seasonal dishes like veal sweetbreads with apples and celery are deeply discounted.

Feel at home in one of Honor & Folly’s two bedrooms (from $165) on the second floor of a carefully rehabilitated two-story building with exposed brick walls and salvaged colored-glass windows. Run by travel blogger Meghan McEwen of DesignTripper, the B&B is decorated with creative accents from vintage suitcases to needlepoint pillows (all made in Detroit or by nearby Midwestern artisans) and nearly everything can be purchased. Be sure to borrow the house vintage bikes to cruise around the up-and-coming neighborhood of Corktown.

Sleep in Victorian style at The Inn on Ferry Street (from $139), comprised of 40 rooms spread across six grand homes and carriage houses from the late nineteenth century. You’ll find vintage details like four-poster beds and carved wooden staircases throughout; request room 2203 in the Roehm House to enjoy the building's original cast-iron tub.

Click HERE to read the full article in New York Magazine!


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