Buddy’s Pizza supports the Great Lakes! $6,000 donation to benefit Alliance for the Great Lakes, Belle Isle A business made famous in the Great Lakes State, Detroit original Buddy’s Pizza is ready to donate $6,000 to the independent citizen’s organization Alliance for the Great Lakes.

In June 2012, Buddy’s Pizza joined forces with the Alliance for the Great Lakes, a nonprofit devoted to protecting and restoring the Great Lakes through education, policy and citizen involvement, to unveil the Made in Michigan Great Lakes Pizza Collection which featured five pies inspired by the Great Lakes.

In addition to a variety of campaigns and initiatives set forth by the Alliance, the donation from Buddy’s will be used to benefit an innovative restoration and education project targeted at returning 72 linear feet of shoreline and coastal wetland on Belle Isle and a litter reduction campaign.

“Michigan is truly a beautiful state, and we owe so much of that beauty to our amazing lakes and bodies of water,” said Robert Jacobs, president of Buddy’s Pizza. “We’re so pleased to present the Alliance for the Great Lakes with a donation that will not only be used to better the Great Lakes, but Belle Isle, which is an iconic Detroit landmark.”

The pizza collection was created to pay tribute to the family restaurant’s Michigan heritage and dedication to everything Pure Michigan. For each pizza from the collection sold, Buddy’s president, Robert Jacobs, announced he would donate $1 to the Alliance in support of the nonprofit’s efforts in maintaining a healthy Pure Michigan environment.

Thanks to an overwhelming response from metro Detroit patrons, the collection fostered a substantial donation to benefit the nonprofit.

"In naming a pizza collection after the Great Lakes, Buddy's Pizza gave every customer a chance to protect this great regional resource -- something we at the Alliance for the Great Lakes do every day," says Joel Brammeier, Alliance president and CEO. "But we don't do it alone. When an established business like Buddy's makes the Great Lakes its priority, everyone who orders up shares in 'a piece of the pie.’"

Additionally, due to metro Detroiters overwhelming support, all five Made in Michigan Great Lakes pizzas will remain on the Buddy’s Pizza menu at all nine locations.

The pizzas are:

Lake Huron – Spinach and artichoke blend, roasted tomatoes, fresh spinach Lake Ontario – Fresh cilantro, Canadian bacon, grilled pineapple, Buddy’s BBQ sauce Lake Michigan – Ground beef, carmelized onions, blue cheese, tomato basil sauce Lake Erie – Red onion, roasted red peppers, salami, pepperoncini, tomato basil sauce Lake Superior – Fresh basil, pine nuts, pepperoni, tomato basil sauce, Buddy’s spice blend.

About Alliance for the Great Lakes Formed in 1970, the Alliance for the Great Lakes is the oldest independent Great Lakes organization in North America. Our mission is to: conserve and restore the world's largest freshwater resource using policy, education and local efforts, ensuring a healthy Great Lakes and clean water for generations of people and wildlife. More about the Alliance for the Great Lakes is online at www.greatlakes.org.

Forbes: Show Starters At The Detroit Auto Show




The North American International Auto Show press days officially begin on Mon. Jan, 14, but on the evening before the show some of the most anticipated automobiles have been revealed at private events held around the Motor City.

The talk of the town is the show-starting 2014 Corvette Stingray, pictured here in my furious effort to document history unfolding on Detroit‘s North End at the reveal. At writing, every detail and sculptural cue is being sussed out by reporters and Corvette enthusiasts who have been waiting eight years for a new model to take over the holy grail of American super cars.

Here’s the quick draw: The 2014 Corvette is in its seventh generation, hence the C-7 moniker. It was inspired by the Corvette Stingray first used by Corvette godfather Bill Mitchell in 1959, but perhaps best embodied by the 1963 Stingray, when Corvette was at the peak of it’s thrill. The C7 is powered by a front-engine V8 that makes 450 hp. And yes, most importantly to Corvette’s allure, it has a whole new exterior style. When it came to first reactions to the exterior appearance, everyone had an opinion about the tail lights the contours — for better or for worse. This is no watered-down meek Corvette. And finally, yes of course the show car is red.

Click HERE to read the full article!

The Farnsworth Community Garden in Detroit. Detroit Works recommends expanding existing neighborhood initiatives, such as community gardens.
 After nearly three years of research, members of the Detroit Works Project unveiled yesterday a host of recommendations for tackling the city’s most daunting economic, infrastructural, and social challenges. From job growth to zoning reform, the recommendations range in scale from small pilot programs to 50-year infrastructure projects. And today the Kresge Foundation and W.K. Kellogg Foundation announced that they will jointly give $3 million to fund an office dedicated to overseeing the implementation of those recommendations.

In addition, all of Kresge's grants for the city over the next five years—a minimum of $150 million—will be aligned with Detroit Works' recommendations.

Detroit has racked up a large collection of shelved master plans, but Detroit Works—an initiative launched by Mayor Dave Bing in 2010, funded primarily by private organizations, to inventory the city’s challenges and make recommendations for renewal—has taken careful steps to buck the trend. The recommendations are the result of meticulous data crunching and communicating with approximately 100,000 community members. In addition, philanthropies, as well as other public and private funders, have pledged financial support for various projects. An implementation committee will continue to advocate for the recommendations.

While accounting for the grim prediction that the city’s population will drop from roughly 700,000 to 600,000 in the next 20 years, the report emphasizes Detroit’s strengths. It calls for building up existing business districts; adaptive reuse rather than demolition for vacant industrial buildings; creating incentives for small businesses to expand; and making use of empty space in large office buildings that have shed jobs over the years. Other recommendations include developing flexible land-use codes, turning little-used roads to rubble for stormwater collection, planting forests along highways, and reconfiguring public bus schedules for higher efficiency.

Click HERE to read the full article! 
Jerry Paffendorf and Mary Lorene Carter, co-founders of the Imagination Station
Jerry Paffendorf and Mary Lorene Carter, co-founders of the Imagination Station, a nonprofit organisation renovating two blighted historic houses to help revive the city. Photograph: Brett Mountain/Eyevine

The raucous scene inside the M@ dison building is not one usually associated with inner-city Detroit.

It appears as though a wacky slice of California's Silicon Valley has landed smack in the middle of a city now just as famous for catastrophic urban blight as for being the spiritual home of America's car industry.

Two youthful tech engineers play table tennis in the middle of a busy open-plan office, while bubble chairs hang from the ceiling. Around a table three people are having an intense discussion and a snatch of their conversation drifts across the room. "Having an eye patch would be kind of cool," insists one, earnestly.

This is no mirage. Increasingly it is a common sight in the Motor City as over the last few years a flood of hi-tech firms have sprung up in downtown Detroit, sparking talk of an urban renaissance in an area laid waste by poverty and abandonment.

The M@ dison building has just been named one of the world's coolest offices by business monthly magazine Inc. The building is not alone. Around the M@ dison a cluster of tech firms, design boutiques and other web-savvy projects have emerged. In their wake have come bars, restaurants, spas and, that ultimate accolade of hip urban youth in America, an upmarket table tennis club. Most are centred on Woodward Avenue, leading to the once-proud street being dubbed "Webward Avenue" by local media.

But, unlike many previous attempts to rejuvenate downtown Detroit, the growth of a tech industry seems to have legs. Suddenly buildings empty for decades are being snapped up and turned into loft apartments. On "Webward", the sound of construction rings out as new buildings rise skywards. In Detroit, so down on its luck for so long, never underestimate the sheer joy the sound of jackhammers brings. "You are seeing construction. It is pretty exciting," said Jim Xiao, a financial analyst for Detroit Venture Partners, the driving force behind the M@ dison and an investor in new tech firms in the city.

Xiao, a 24-year-old who evaluates tech firms for DVP to finance, has trouble concealing his enthusiasm. He lives in one of the converted buildings nearby, socialises at the new downtown bars and has a keen sense of mission about tech's role in the city's future. "Where else in the country can you make an actual impact on a whole city when you are in your 20s?" he said.

As a former resident of Seattle and Microsoft employee, Xiao is typical of the breed of tech engineers and entrepreneurs popping up in Detroit. Already DVP has invested in 18 startups in under two years. The aim is to set up many of them in the M@ dison and then watch them grow, leave to find their own offices and have their spaces filled by an already long waiting list of new ones looking for a leg up. In a city known for the "big three" of General Motors, Chrysler and Ford, the corporate names around "Webward Avenue" now boldly proclaim their arrival with techie monikers such as Doodle Home, Tapjoy and Bizdom. Nor is it just in downtown that the tech industry is taking hold. In one of the furthest-flung parts of the city, Brightmoor, there are plans to set up a project called TechTown that will help locals start or improve their businesses.

One of the biggest success stories is Detroit Labs, which makes apps for mobile phones, iPads and other tablets. The firm has grown from nothing to being 30-strong in 18 months and is about to move out of the M@ dison for two floors of office space of its own. Detroit Labs co-founder Paul Glomski is another evangelist for the city. "There is the cool grit factor with Detroit. This is a genuine, hardworking place. It is not superficial. It is full of people getting things done," he said.

It is not just new firms giving birth to the hi-tech industry in Detroit. The giant car-makers are playing a role too. The industry, which is bouncing back after a government bailout during the recession, is producing cars increasingly focused on tech. As a result, the big three are hiring thousands of software engineers as vehicles become internet-connected and tech-oriented.

Click HERE to read the full article! 
Mix master: Travis Fourmont, a bartender at Roast at the Westin Book Cadillac in Detroit, makes his Manhattan on Thursday, Jan. 11, 2013, during the competition in Manhattan, N.Y.
Photo from Freep.com

What bartender makes America’s best Manhattan?

According to judges in the Woodford Reserve Master of the Manhattan contest held Thursday in Manhattan — where else? — it’s Travis Fourmont of Roast restaurant at the Westin Book Cadillac Detroit.

Fourmont of Berkley was one of six national finalists who competed for the title on Jan. 7, mixing his variation of the classic drink for a panel of celebrity judges. The competitors were chosen in local and regional contests.

Click HERE to read the full article! 
Image:
Stephen McGee / for NBC News

The building has been abandoned for years, but its windows aren’t broken and there’s no graffiti on its walls – unlike so many other forgotten hulks nearby in the long-impoverished southwest corner of Detroit.

Community organizers promise to soon reopen the Mexicantown Mercado and turn it into an anchor for the city’s Latino community. They also hope to turn the complex into a shining example of what can happen in Detroit with help from the companies that transformed the once sleepy Midwest town into the Motor City..

As part of Operation Brighter Future, Ford Motor Co. is pumping $10 million into the resurrection of the Mexicantown Mercado – which will serve as a new food bank and community center and be renamed the Ford Resource and Engagement Center. Company officials, notably including new Chief Operating Officer Mark Fields, promise still more aid to come for the long-beleaguered Detroit..

Such moves are not entirely altruistic, said Fields. Detroit’s long-running problems don’t just serve as the butt of jokes when he travels, but the transplanted Jersey boy has also seen firsthand that it can be difficult to get others to migrate to Motown. .

“The community we live in can be either a draw – or not – to get the best and brightest we need for our company’s future,” Fields said. .

Ford is by no means alone. Since emerging from bankruptcy in 2009, General Motors has ramped up its involvement in a city that is teetering on bankruptcy. So has Chrysler, which moved its headquarters to the fringe suburb of Auburn Hills more than two decades ago..

There’s no question that Detroit needs all the help it can get. .

The making of Motor City.

In the years after World War II, the “Arsenal of Democracy” was a major part of American pride about its industrial muscle – and the primary source of the machines that helped transport U.S. workers out to the fast-growing suburbs. But over the years, the factories and jobs followed, leaving a city of abandoned assembly and supplier plants and rapidly shrinking communities, especially after the riots of the mid-1960s..

Whole neighborhoods have vanished or are largely filled with abandoned homes and once-thriving businesses. In the 1950 census, Detroit’s population peaked at 1.85 million, making it the nation’s fifth-largest city. That dwindled to 706,585 people in 2011, according to the U.S. Census estimate. During the previous decade, the city lost one resident every 22 minutes.

Click HERE to read the full article! 
Detroit City Is the Place to Be
Author Mark Binelli grew up in a Detroit in decline during the 1970s. The city used to embody the American dream: the auto industry, consumer culture and Motown.

When Rolling Stone magazine asked him to write about the Detroit auto show in January 2009, Binelli tells weekends on All Things Considered host Jacki Lyden, he jumped on it.

But Binelli didn't stop there. He moved back to his hometown to chronicle the city. He put it all into a book called Detroit City Is the Place to Be: The Afterlife of an American Metropolis.

Covering Detroit as a native

"When I got there, I realized Detroit had become this poster city for the recession. I mean, reporters were coming [from all over the] country, all over the world, really, to look at the place, and I felt like, as someone who'd grown up there, I could really bring a little bit more nuance to the story, and not tell the same stories that are being told over and over — and that includes things like humor. I mean, Detroit is a very surreal, weird place, and I thought a lot of that was being missed by reporters who were just coming in for an afternoon or a day or two."

Visiting the 'zone'

"It's a huge swath of land — 190 acres — that had been a residential neighborhood once upon a time. It was raised by the city, and was supposed to become an industrial park. The idea was lots of factories would move in, and nothing happened. So, it's hard to really convey what it is like. You're basically five minutes from downtown of a major American city, but you are standing in these fields, that, I mean you could be in rural Arkansas, and you can still see traces of the old neighborhood. The sidewalks are so overgrown, they are almost invisible, but if you look carefully you can see the sidewalks ... You will notice a glimpse of red, and it turns out to be an old fire hydrant that is covered with grass that is 3 feet high. It's a surreal place."

Room for improvement

"One of the problems with Detroit is, you know, it was a city that at its peak, population was 2 million. Now with this last census, in 2010, it's down to just over 700,000, so you have all this vacant land, all of these abandoned buildings, what do you do with it? I mean, one of the more intriguing things that's been talked about, not much progress has been made so far, has been this sort of right-sizing initiative. That's the euphemistic term they have been using. Basically the idea is to convince people, incentivize people somehow, to move to denser urban cores, so then you would have the vacant land concentrated, and you could turn that into parks, possibility into farms.

Click HERE to read the full article! 
josh noel | chicago tribune
 Many people can’t see past this city’s abandoned buildings and overgrown lots, and that’s sort of fair. A city once boasting 2 million people and an unbreakable auto industry is down to 700,000 and apocalyptic decay in every direction. But look past the blocks of broken windows, sunken roofs and graffiti, and there is a Detroit stirring back to life. The word revitalization might be a bit strong, but as low as the city has sunk, its subtle energy and excitement put it at a fascinating crossroads: Bruised old times, meet scrappy invention.

You see it in the food and drink, the art, the rebuilt urban trails and the people. I learned it at my first stop: a modern barbecue joint called Slows Bar-B-Q, which is widely credited for jump-starting the Corktown neighborhood west of downtown. People wait two hours to sit during the weekends. During my wait, I met Felix Nguyen, 34, a hotel manager with friends in town for one of the nation’s biggest electronic music festivals.

Nguyen explained that she lived in Detroit in the 1990s, moved to the Chicago suburbs and then back to Detroit because she missed it.

“The people are real here,” Nguyen said. She proved it by asking me to join her and her friends for dinner. Over our plates of meat and pints of Michigan craft beer, she explained how things have improved.

“When I lived here in the ’90s, everything was closed at 5, and there were no grocery stores,” Nguyen said. “The customer service was the worst I ever had in my life.” Where, exactly? “Detroit,” she said. “All of it. But now the whole vibe is different.”

Father and son Steve and Austin Snell, whom I met on my way out, had driven in from the suburbs to drop Austin’s sister off at a concert and stopped at Slows because of its glowing reputation. Before dinner, Steve sipped a gin and tonic two doors over, at Sugar House, Detroit’s first craft cocktail bar — no big deal in many urban areas but significant in Detroit.

Click HERE to read the full article! 

Visit NBCNews.com for breaking news, world news, and news about the economy


Recent economic reports point to a national economic recovery that is moving in the right direction, albeit slowly. The unemployment rate continues to edge down, housing prices are recovering, and GDP growth has been relatively strong. That modest aggregate progress belied tremendous variation in the rate of recovery across the nation's major metropolitan economies through the third quarter of 2012.

This edition of the Metro Monitor finds that from July to September of this year, employment growth across the 100 largest U.S. metro areas remained steady, but was slower than during the relatively strong months of January to March. Meanwhile growth in output accelerated across the 100 largest metro areas, matching the rate from the first quarter. Unemployment rates continued to fall in more than half (65) of all large metropolitan areas, but remained above 6 percent in all but 14 of these places. Home prices reversed course in most large metro areas, posting gains after two consecutive quarters of losses that had carried most places to new lows.

Regionally, however, progress was much more varied. The overall pace of economic recovery was strong in a handful of areas including Texas, where the recession was less severe and oil and gas have boomed; in western Florida and parts of California and the Intermountain West where the housing and labor markets are rebounding; in some Midwestern manufacturing centers like Detroit, Grand Rapids, and Toledo; and in the Pacific Northwest. By contrast, the recovery has proceeded more slowly in the Northeast where many metro areas had relatively minor recessions when compared with faster-recovering markets. As a result, they are closer to pre-recession levels of jobs, output, and home prices than many harder hit places.

Detroit-Warren-Livonia
  • Unemployment decreased by 5.2 percentage points since the third quarter of 2009, the second-largest reduction nationally in percentage terms. 
  • Employment growth ranks 17th overall, rising 5 percent since the third quarter of 2009. 
  • Economic output growth ranks 20th, rising 9.6 percent since the third quarter of 2009. 
  • Housing prices rose 1.9 percent since the second quarter of 2012, 23rd best in the U.S.
Click HERE to read the full article with fun charts and graphs to really drive the point home :)! 


Fabergé: The Rise and Fall, The Collection of the Virginia Museum of Fine Arts
Sunday, October 14, 2012 – Monday, January 21, 2013

Fabergé: The Rise and Fall, The Collection of the Virginia Museum of Fine Arts Fabergé: The Rise and Fall features more than 200 precious objects from the Virginia Museum of Fine Arts, home of the largest collection of Fabergé in the United States. The show traces Karl Fabergé’s rise to fame, highlighting his business savvy, artistic innovations, and privileged relationship with the Russian aristocracy. Despite the firm's abrupt end in 1918, the legacy and name of Fabergé continues to hold a place in popular culture.

Click HERE to reserve your tickets! 
Having moved across the world before settling in New York, Shel Kimen returned to Detroit - where her father and grandfather worked in the motor industry

An ambitious plan to transform a derelict railway yard in Detroit into a boutique 36 room hotel using old shipping containers is close to being realised.

The $4 million project is planned for a part of the Dequindre Cut, an old rail line in the decaying city that was has already been renovated into a bike and walking path.

The ambitious plan to regenerate a large swathe of the city whose descent has signified America's industrial decline has attracted the attention of the City of Detroit who are keen to see any type of urban investment.

The firm behind the project, Collision Works wants to create the 16,000 square-foot hotel near Division Street in the Michigan city to have 3,000 square feet of event space and a large outdoor courtyard.

'It's a boutique hotel and community work space built around storytelling,' said Shel Kimen, founder & CEO of Collision Works, who left New York City to help transform a decrepit part of Detroit.

It's a place to let people tell their stories and to give these stories a home. The idea is when people of different perspectives and backgrounds come together interesting things happen.'

Wanting to create a meeting space in addition to the hotel, the hotel will also have a communal working space that will be big enough to accommodate between 15-20 people.

'I came here because this city is perfect for me,' said Kimen.

'I can't think of a city that's more exciting -- so many people who are trying different things. It's the art. It's the freedom and the space. It's that there's something different happening.'

Kimen has traveled the world working in Chicago, San Francisco, London, Portland and New York, including stints at Saatchi and Saatchi.

'I believe business has a responsibility to contribute to the community -- that products have to be meaningful and valuable,' she said.

'One day I realized, I'm an entrepreneur and what am I going to invent?'

Click HERE to read the full article!

 Few people recognize the growth that is occurring in Detroit and its surrounding cities. Between the auto industry layoffs and the plethora of decaying buildings, the mainstream media has painted a picture of disaster and despair. Contrary to those reports, there are thousands of individuals working hard to turn Detroit around. Some of them manufacture new televisions -- others produce components for new watches. Many of them will help a major automaker complete its IT transformation .

Then there are the dozens of men and women that have helped Benzinga transform into a dynamic and innovative financial media outlet.

"It is crazy to think that two-and-a-half years ago this started in my basement," said Jason Raznick, the President and co-founder of Benzinga. "Now we're in an 8,000 square foot office with almost 30 people."

Raznick, who said that Benzinga has a "really big vision" for the future, was one of five Detroit entrepreneurs who spoke on a panel at Opportunity Detroit this week. He was joined by John Fikany, the VP of Microsoft's (NASDAQ: MSFT ) U.S. commercial sector; Michael Webster, Executive VP of Kelly Services; Nathan Labenz, co-founder of Stik.com; and Shinola's Jacques Panis.

"Us being in Michigan, we feel like we have something to prove much more than if we were in another state," said Raznick. "I don't know if we work harder but we think we do. There are guys that are in the office throughout the night."

Raznick spoke proudly about Benzinga's partnership with Microsoft. "John from that little company, Microsoft, became a client of ours for the Windows 8 launch," he said. "We're one of the main [financial sites] there alongside Reuters and The Wall Street Journal. We have competitors. The only way that happens is that we outwork our competition, and we do that time and time again. That's why Microsoft came to us for more and more stuff. We're building really cool things."

Ultimately, Raznick said that Benzinga's goal is to "change the investment game."

Click HERE to read the full article!!! 


Welcome to SPD's Cover of the Day, a portfolio of brilliant magazine and newspaper cover design from around the world. Its time to choose your favorite of the year! Round 1 starts with covers from January, February, and March (in alphabetic order). Look for Round 2, 3, and 4 in the coming days. Then come the finals!

Click HERE to see all the covers and vote for Boat Magazine's Detroit Cover



The city of Detroit is turning red to raise awareness of the final days metro Detroiters can donate to The Salvation Army’s 2012 Red Kettle Campaign, which ends when red kettles leave storefronts across metro Detroit on Christmas Eve.

The second annual Paint the City Red celebration kicked off at 12:01 a.m. Monday, Dec. 17 when the General Motors Renaissance Center began glowing red. The Detroit skyline’s most identifiable riverfront building will beam The Salvation Army’s iconic red shield from its main electronic sign on the center’s tallest tower through Christmas Day. The bands around each tower will also glow red for the duration.

The Ren Cen going red is a precursor to Paint the City Red festivities slated for Friday, Dec. 21 when:

the Compuware and Chase Buildings will join the Renaissance Center in sporting a rosy glow.

· several of Detroit’s most beloved churches will simultaneously ring their bells for one minute at 9:50 a.m. Scheduled to ring are: Cathedral of St. Paul, Mariner's Church of Detroit, Old St. Mary's, St. Bonaventure, St. Florian, St. Francis D’Assisi, St. John's Episcopal and St. Joseph Sweetest Heart of Mary.

· bell ringers will man red kettles throughout the workday at the Griswold Street entrance of the historic Guardian Building in the heart of downtown Detroit’s central business district.

The centerpiece of the Paint the City Red observance is a lunchtime celebration in Campus Martius Park from 11 a.m. – 1:30 p.m. Friday, Dec. 21. The Salvation Army is partnering with Quicken Loans to host a variety of activities around the downtown Detroit outdoor venue, including:

Noon – 1 p.m. - a friendly bell-ringing competition for red kettle fundraising bragging rights among Quicken Loans’ top executives, including Bill Emerson, CEO; Mike Lyon, vice president of operations and Tim Birkmeier, vice president of banking. Jeff Eisenshtadt, CEO of Title Source will also join in the bell ringing contest.

11 a.m. - 2 p.m. - a gathering of food trucks serving fresh fare, including fan favorites El Guapo and Mac Shack. Refreshments will also be available from Campus Martius’ Arctic Zone.

11:30 a.m. – 12:30 p.m. - appearances by the Detroit Tigers’ mascot Paws and the Detroit Lions’ mascot Roary

Noon – 12:30 p.m. - an appearance by cast members of “Jersey Boys,” who’ll sing carols, ring bells and pose for photos with red kettle donors Noon – 1 p.m. - a live performance of holiday classics by The Salvation Army Brass Band

In addition, the Campus Martius Park ice rink will be hopping from noon – 1 p.m. as Quicken Loans team members lace up for an open skate and warm up with hot chocolate, courtesy of the mortgage company.

Capturing it all will be WWJ Newsradio 950, which will share live interviews and reports from Campus Martius Park from 11 a.m. – 1:30 p.m. The station will also air feature interviews with Salvation Army officers and clients throughout the day to encourage public donations during the final days of the 2012 Red Kettle Campaign.

“We invite everyone to rally together with us to Paint the City Red in support of our 2012 Red Kettle mission,” said Major Mark Anderson, General Secretary and Metro Detroit Area Commander of The Salvation Army of Metro Detroit. “This is the home stretch of our campaign and we’re relying on the community to help us reach our $8.5 million goal.”

Paint the City Red revelers looking to continue the celebration can visit Somerset Collection CityLoft, located two blocks north of Campus Martius Park at 1261 Woodward. Cityloft, and the entire 1200 block of Woodward between Grand River and State, will be open for last-minute shopping from 12 p.m.-9 p.m. on Friday, Dec. 21. Merchandise from 40+ Somerset pop-up stores and quirky outdoor retailer Moosejaw will be available for shoppers to find the perfect gift for that special someone.

To make a tax deductible contribution to The Salvation Army Red Kettle Campaign:

· Drop a donation into one of nearly 450 red kettles at storefronts across metro Detroit through Dec. 24, or Christmas week at area Kroger and Busch Fresh Food Market locations, which will continue hosting red kettles through Dec. 29

· Visit www.salmich.org · Call 877-SAL-MICH · Text "GOODMICH" TO 80888* (an automatic $10 donation) · Send a check or money order, made payable to The Salvation Army, to: 16130 Northland Dr., Southfield, MI 48075


Rock Ventures today announced the purchase of five additional properties, wrapping up a year in which it acquired eight buildings totaling 630,000 square feet of commercial space.

The newest acquisitions bring Rock Ventures’ downtown Detroit real estate investments to 15 buildings totaling 2.6 million square feet of commercial space, and three parking structures for a combined 3,500 parking spaces.

In addition, Rock Ventures broke ground on a 33,000 square-foot specialty retail development and 10-story parking garage last month, renovated 633,000 square feet of commercial space, and located 45 companies to the city, including Twitter, Chrysler, Metro-West Appraisal, and numerous technology related start-ups. Rock Ventures’ family of companies, including Quicken Loans and Title Source, has brought 7,000-plus people to work in downtown Detroit since August 2010.

“It has been an exciting year of opportunity in Detroit,” said Dan Gilbert, Founder and Chairman of Rock Ventures and Quicken Loans. “Our focus in 2013 will be on the three R’s – residential, rail and retail – all of which are vital in creating the vibrant, thriving urban core that we all envision.”

Rock Ventures’ newest building acquisitions include:

1201 Woodward - Kresge Building

The 54,000 square-foot property built in 1891 was home to the former Kresge store. The nine-story building, located on the northwest corner of Woodward Avenue and State Street, will be renovated to accommodate first floor retail and either office or residential space above. A portion of the first floor currently houses The Detroit Shoppe and Detroit Artist Market pop-up stores.

1217 Woodward

This five-story 30,000 square-foot building is located on the west side of Woodward Avenue, immediately north of the Kresge Building. Built in 1891, the building will be renovated and used for first floor retail and either office or residential space above. A portion of the first floor currently houses Santa’s Wonderland, a seasonal store specifically for children with proceeds benefitting Detroit Goodfellows, ensuring there is “No Kiddie without a Christmas.”

1412 Woodward

Located on the east side of Woodward Avenue between Grand River Avenue and John R Street, this three-story building was built in 1916. The 6,000 square-foot building is currently unoccupied, but will feature first floor retail with office space above.

1301 Broadway - Cary Building Lofts

The 20,000 square-foot building, built in 1906, is located on the west corner of Gratiot Avenue and Broadway Street. The five-story structure will undergo extensive renovations to accommodate first floor retail space with residential space above. · 1521 Broadway - Small Plates Building The 9,300 square-foot building is 100 percent occupied by Small Plates restaurant on the first floor with four residential loft apartments above. The five-story building is located on the west side of Broadway Street between John R and Witherell Street.

The building purchases were brokered by Bedrock Real Estate Services, Rock Ventures’ full-service real estate firm. Bedrock leases, develops and manages all of Rock Ventures’ buildings, and has helped locate more than 65 companies to downtown Detroit since August 2010.

“The need for retail and updated office and residential space in downtown Detroit is keeping Bedrock extremely busy,” said Jim Ketai, Managing Partner at Bedrock, adding that the firm has grown by nearly 60 percent in the past year to keep up with the demand.”


Best Mac and Cheese in the U.S. Every chef has a version of ultra-comforting macaroni and cheese, with nuances ranging from how many gooey cheeses can fit into a single batch to crunchy toppings like sourdough bread crumbs. Here, where to get the best mac and cheese in the country. —Justine Sterling

Slows Bar BQ, Detroit

Brian Perrone’s superrich mac-n-cheese is so intense that it has been called “a truly life-changing experience” by Man v. Food host Adam Richman. The signature side dish includes medium pasta shells, creamy béchamel sauce and mild cheddar cheese. For a final cheesy touch, Perrone grates more cheddar on top and broils it. “It is really quite luxurious,” Perrone says. slowsbarbq.com

Click HERE to see who else made 'The Best Mac And Cheese In The U.S.' List!
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