Photo: Lundgren Photography 
4. Detroit, Mich.

Jobs added from 2010 through 2012: 92,407 (up 5 percent) According to a report published by think tank Brookings Institution, Detroit tops the nation — coming second only to Charleston, SC — as the area that's added the most manufacturing jobs in the country from January 2010 through 2011.

Source: CareerBuilder and Economic Modeling Specialists (EMSI)

Click HERE for the full article on Business Insider. 

The final weekend of Tashmoo Biergarten is here! On Saturday, October 27 Tashmoo will run in conjunction with the Villages Fall Festival, and on Sunday, October 28 Liquid Table Beverage Solutions is coordinating The Brewers’ Brunch as the final event of the 4th Annual Detroit Beer Week.

Many local brewers, as well as the Detroit Beer Week staff will be on hand to discuss the beers. From 12 noon until 3 pm, enjoy a Michigan Bloody Mary bar, coffee and beer drinks from Great Lakes Coffee, and a menu of suggested food and beer pairings featuring our participating food vendors: Simply Suzanne, Corridor Sausage, Treat Dreams and People's Pierogi.

Last year a vacant patch of land in Detroit’s West Village was transformed by a group of local artists, foodies, designers and writers into the Tashmoo Biergarten, a pop-up, European-style Biergarten. After serving more than 7,000 people and raising funds for multiple community organizations,

Tashmoo came back in 2012 for three consecutive weekends, Saturday, October 27 and Sunday, October 28, being the last.

Saturday, October 27- Sunday, October 28
Tashmoo Biergarten
1416 Van Dyke
Detroit, Michigan 48226

About Tashmoo Biergarten
Since it has opened, Tashmoo Biergarten has brought over 7,000 people to West Village, raising awareness for the historical neighborhood, with proceeds from past events going to the Villages Community Development Corporation and to the Waldorf School. Tashmoo is made possible by the hard work and dedication of Team Tashmoo, and army of volunteers and the generous support of our partners, lovio george | communications + design, Marvin Shaouni Photography, Vitamin Water, Simply Suzanne and the Villages of Detroit. All of the funds raised go to the Villages Community Development Corporation.

Find out more about Tashmoo Biergarten at tashmoodetroit.com, or on Facebook at www.fb.com/TashmooDetroit or www.facebook.com/DetroitBeerWeek
The Michigan Film Office announced today three projects – the Internet program Detroit Rubber, the feature film RoboCop and the web series The Castle – have been approved for film incentives from the state.

“All of these projects present an opportunity to showcase Michigan – whether through our filmmakers, our iconic locations, or the talented cast and crew we have here in the state,” said Carrie Jones, director of the Michigan Film Office. “We are seeing the rise of young entrepreneurs through Detroit Rubber and the return of RoboCop to Detroit, which is a testament to the range and diversity of projects we are supporting in the state.”

The feature film RoboCop was also awarded an incentive of $294,312 on $1,057,356 of projected in-state expenditures for second unit shoots in Detroit. The project expected to hire 81 Michigan workers with a full time equivalent of three jobs.

In RoboCop, the year is 2028 and multinational conglomerate OmniCorp is at the center of robot technology. Their drones are winning American wars around the globe and now they want to bring this technology to the home front. Alex Murphy (Joel Kinnaman) is a loving husband, father and good cop doing his best to stem the tide of crime and corruption in Detroit. After he is critically injured in the line of duty, OmniCorp utilizes their remarkable science of robotics to save Alex’s life. He returns to the streets of his beloved city with amazing new abilities, but with issues a regular man has never had to face before.

Scenes shot in Michigan include various Detroit landmarks and other exterior shots.

Click HERE to read the full article!

ChallegeDetroit_615x327.jpg

Can 30 creative thinkers make a difference to a city in need? A Detroit economic and entrepreneurial development organization called The Collaborative Group is betting on it.

Devastated by the collapse of the auto industry that fueled the region's growth, Detroit has fallen into dire straits. The city, which has a poverty rate of 37.6 percent, is the poorest major city in America. Residents are moving out in droves: Detroit's population has shrunk by a quarter in the past decade.

Led by the vision of The Collaborative Group board member Doyle Mosher, the group's Challenge Detroit initiative is focused on building a young, educated workforce in the region, starting with just 30 people.

In September, Challenge Detroit brought 30 talented young people--hand-picked from a group of nearly 1,000--to Detroit for an innovative one-year program that challenges them to live, work, play, and give in the nation's most impoverished major city.

The 30 Challenge Detroit Fellows are a mix of recent college graduates, artists, lawyers, urban policy specialists, and other innovators. As Fellows, they've received year-long job placements with local host companies from large businesses like Quicken Loans and Chrysler, to startups like ePrize and HiredMyWay.

"We found companies that were willing to step up and take a chance on innovative thinkers," says Deirdre Greene Groves, executive director of The Collaborative Group. "Some had defined roles in mind, while others said, 'When we meet the person we want, we'll know and let them define the position.'"

Click HERE to read the full article on The Atlantic! 
Jeanette Pierce stands on an outside balcony in the high-rise apartment building she lives in downtown Detroit, Michigan on October 16, 2012. REUTERS-Rebecca Cook
Jeanette Pierce stands on an outside balcony in the high-rise apartment building she lives in downtown
Detroit, Michigan on October 16, 2012. 

Credit: REUTERS/Rebecca Cook

When Jeanette Pierce moved into a downtown Detroit high-rise seven years ago, she could always count on getting into The Well, a local bar with wood-paneled walls, dartboards and an X-Box in the corner. Now she can barely squeeze in.

"There could be a line with as many as 150 to 175 people at the bar," said Pierce, 31, co-founder of a nonprofit that promotes Detroit. She's wistful for the nights when just 50 patrons would show up.

Pierce's neighborhood is an example of the renaissance and growth seen in a handful of areas in Detroit, a city whose overall fortunes and population have tumbled, especially in the last decade with the contraction of the American auto industry.

City officials and business leaders, who bristle over media fixation on crime and budget misery, are hoping to turn attention to Detroit's green shoots: bustling restaurants, community gardens and long waiting lists for apartments.

Last month the nonprofit Detroit Regional News Hub, which connects journalists to people and organizations involved in rebuilding the city, held a promotional day-and-a-half event. "Transformation Detroit" featured talks by city officials, including Mayor Dave Bing, business owners, real estate developers and others invested in the city's recovery.

Among them was Blue Cross Blue Shield of Michigan, which recently finished moving 3,400 employees who had been based in the suburb of Southfield to a complex of five buildings huddled near the Detroit River.

The city is also home to 1,400 gardens tended by 15,000 to 20,000 mostly volunteer gardeners, said Rebecca Salminen Witt, president of the Greening of Detroit. The 23-year-old nonprofit agency seeks to reclaim open spaces and restore the local ecosystem through tree planting and urban agriculture. The produce - 200 tons are harvested each year - is distributed to the community and sold at neighborhood farmers' markets in Detroit, and the income is plowed back into the collaborative.

The event was partly sponsored by the Detroit Economic Growth Corporation, a nonprofit whose board is appointed by city officials.

"We have to create the kind of environment to make people stay," Bing, a Democrat elected three years ago, told reporters. "We're well on our way to doing that."

Click HERE to read the full article on Reuters! 



Detroit had earned its hangover — the Tigers pulling off a sweep of the Yankees on Thursday to win their 11th American League pennant — so I left the slumbering city early Friday and hit the road home to New York. Soon after I got around Toledo and turned east on the Ohio Turnpike, I came to a realization about this insanely important swing state: it’s so flat and so boring that driving across it gives your mind a chance to roam. And mine was way off the leash.

Through my ancient Mazda’s cracked windshield, I kept seeing vivid snapshots of my three whirlwind days in the Motor City. Odd to say, but one of the most memorable days was Wednesday, when Game 4 was scheduled but no game was played. It proved to be a great day for conspiracy theorists.

I arrived at the ballpark late, detained by a fat Dominican cigar and a much fatter raconteur at a downtown saloon. “It’s a myth that Dick the Bruiser beat the tar out of Alex Karras at the Lindell A.C.,” he told me with iron conviction, disputing something I had reported as fact in this newspaper. “Never happened!”

Chastened, I quit the saloon. The game should have been half an hour old by the time I approached the turnstiles at Comerica Park, but the packed stadium, usually a house of bedlam, was eerily quiet. I turned to a guy standing next to the big statue of the tiger and asked what was up.

“Rain delay,” replied Terry Franconi, who had come to the game carrying a broom — a goad for the Tigers to turn their 3-0 lead into a four-game sweep. Alas, brooms were banned from the ball yard. Besides, Franconi didn’t have a ticket.

“But it’s not raining,” I said.

“They say it’s going to.” Then he offered a prediction that had nothing to do with the weather: “I honestly don’t think the Tigers are going to win tonight because there’s too much money to be lost if they sweep. The umps and refs know how to make it a close game.”

It wasn’t raining inside the park either, but I heard people talking about a big storm that was to the west and closing in fast. Half an hour passed, an hour, an hour and a half — and still no rain. It was like being trapped inside a jampacked keg party with 43,000 guests, everyone getting hammered because there was nothing else to do. I noticed that the grounds crew hadn’t even pulled the tarp over the infield dirt, despite that big bad storm that was supposed to be on its way. Strange. I started thinking about how much money the concession stands were making, and that got me thinking about Terry Franconi’s remarks. Maybe some kind of fix really was on.

Finally, the rain started to fall two hours after the first pitch was supposed to be thrown — plenty of time to get in most of a game — and the tarp came out and the fans went home. It was a first for me: a two-hour rain delay without any rain.

After the nongame, I went to a different saloon and bumped into Brian McGuire, who works as something called a search engine marketing analyst for a Detroit advertising agency. “I don’t mean to sound like a conspiracy theorist,” he told me, “but I think the powers that be knew this game wasn’t going to happen. The interest is in money — the chance for advertising, marketing, alcohol sales. Let’s milk the cow, then put her to bed and milk her again tomorrow. It’s capitalism.”

All these dark theories became moot the following day, when sunshine drenched the field and Game 4 started on schedule a little after 4 p.m. As I gazed out at the emerald outfield, I had to admit that I, like many old-schoolers before me, had been utterly seduced by Comerica Park, which opened in 2000, replacing Tiger Stadium, the charming old dowager where I grew up watching baseball and football games. They tore the place down in 2008, breaking many hearts.

Click HERE to read the full article on The New York Times! 


Getty Images 

Excerpt:

So, how did the Tigers end up winning the American League pennant and winding up in the World Series? Simply put, by becoming less a collection of stars and an actual team.

All season, the Tigers’ general manager, Dave Dombrowski, and Leyland made adjustments — trading for pitchers like Anibal Sanchez and second baseman Omar Infante and gambling on rookies like Quintin Berry and Avisail Garcia. And, they were patient with the starting pitchers, who eventually became the key to the team’s playoff victories over the Oakland Athletics and the New York Yankees. Verlander, Max Scherzer, Doug Fister and Sanchez — who one sportswriter joked are the Tigers’ equivalent of the Four Tops — have become the glue that has held the team together.

You also can’t overlook the participation of the Tigers’ loyal, if sometimes frustrated fans. Before the season began, the Tigers sold 22,000 season ticket packages, or more than half the seats available for any game, based on the excitement generated by Fielder, who signed a $214 million, nine-year contract.

All summer, it was more likely that Comerica Park would be sold out than not, despite some of the hottest afternoons and evenings in recent memory. And while Tiger fans have vented their anger at times, they never booed their players as loudly as Yankee fans did in recent weeks. They’ve been consistently loyal, if questioning.

Click HERE to read the full article on Forbes! 
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