Behind the Scenes: President Obama's Visit to Detroit

The Detroit River Regatta Association (DRRA) is proud to announce that the Detroit Yacht Club (DYC) will host a fundraiser to help preserve a great Detroit tradition on Friday, April 27th from 5:30pm-8:30pm. The night will feature silent and live auctions with food and live entertainment.

Proceeds from the night will go towards the operating expenses for the long standing Detroit hydroplane races, to be held on July 13-15th on the Detroit River. As the presenting sponsor the DYC is leading the charge for sponsorship dollars and will attempt to raise more than the $100,000 that was raised the previous year.

Tickets are $100 a person and corporate tables are available while they last. To make reservations please call Jennifer McDonnell at 313-824-2788 or Carly Roberts at 313-824-2887.

About the Detroit Gold Cup: The APBA Gold Cup, also known as the APBA Challenge Cup, is among the most prestigious of motorsport trophies, in part because it is the oldest active trophy in all of motorsports. The trophy was first awarded in 1904! In comparison, the first Indianapolis 500 race was held in 1911 and their Borg-Warner trophy was first awarded in 1936.

Buddy’s Pizza solidified its shape as Detroit’s original square pizza 66 years ago. But the family-owned pizzeria, with nine locations across the metropolitan Detroit area, has also made a name for itself in the business of giving back.

For the past 36 years Buddy’s Pizza has paired up with the Capuchin Soup Kitchen to help feed hungry people and support the agency’s other programs. On Monday, April 16, 2012, all Buddy’s locations will again host its annual Slice for Life charity event.

Owner Robert Jacobs noted that the partnership between Buddy’s Pizza and the Capuchin Soup Kitchen was driven entirely by Buddy’s employees. “It began as an effort to shine a spotlight on Capuchin Soup Kitchen and to assist those in need throughout the metro Detroit area,” said Jacobs. “Over the years Buddy’s Pizza has hosted its Slice for Life benefit, the Capuchin Soup Kitchen has expanded its services to the community.”

Since its start, the Slice for Life event has helped raise more than $2.5 million dollars to support the Capuchin Soup Kitchen. The agency tends to people’s basic needs—especially the need for food—but all its programs strive to stimulate minds, nourish spirits and address root causes of social injustice. Included in those programs are two sites that serve daily hot meals, a bakery where men learn a trade after leaving prison or a treatment program, a shower facility for people who lack opportunity to bathe elsewhere, a food pantry, a clothing center, a children’s tutoring and art therapy program, substance abuse treatment, and Earthworks (an organic urban farm). This year’s goal is $100,000.

“The annual Buddy’s Slice for Life day is eagerly anticipated by Capuchin Soup Kitchen staff and volunteers, and for many is their favorite fundraiser of the year,” said Br. Jerry Smith, executive director of the Capuchin Soup Kitchen. “The financial benefits are obvious. Every year the event raises many thousands of dollars for the Soup Kitchen’s general fund, which enables us in turn to feed thousands of people and provide them an array of other services.

“The one-day ‘party’ spotlights our partnership with Buddy’s, but a lesser known fact is that every week of the year Buddy’s provides the Soup Kitchen with dozens of pizzas that are then included in the food packages distributed by our emergency food pantry. They are a special treat much enjoyed by the recipients.”

From 11 a.m. to 10 p.m. on April 16, pizza fans have a chance to support all of those initiatives. Slice for Life ticket holders may choose to dine in to enjoy all-you-can-eat two-topping pizzas and salad or carry out a 4-square two-topping pizza or a medium sized Antipasto, Greek or house salad. Buddy’s Pizza has locations in Detroit, Auburn Hills, Dearborn, Livonia, Warren, Farmington Hills, Grosse Pointe, and carry-out only locations in Bloomfield Hills and Royal Oak. Maps and locations can be found at www.buddyspizza.com.

Tickets, $15 for adults and $6 for children, may be purchased in advance by calling (313) 579-2100 ext. 170 or buy them at the door of any Buddy’s Pizza location on April 16. With every adult ticket purchased, patrons will receive a $3 off coupon for an 8 square pizza. All participants may also register to win one 8-square Buddy’s Pizza every month for one year.
Glen Allison / Getty Images

TIME

A city infamous for its unemployment, decay, crime and population loss would seem an odd place for an upscale natural and organic grocery chain to plant roots, but yuppie favorite Whole Foods is taking a gamble on the Motor City.

The Austin, Texas-based retailer plans to open a 20,000-square-foot supermarket with about 75 employees in Detroit’s Midtown next year. One reason it may be willing to take the risk is that the neighborhood is an anomaly in a tough city enduring very tough times: People are moving in, businesses are opening and hopes are high.

Midtown wouldn’t yet qualify as a success story by revitalization standards in New York or Chicago. The 2-square-mile collection of smaller neighborhoods north of downtown still has vacancies and lacks the bustling, thriving feel of some of those larger cities’ neighborhoods in transition. But it has solid anchors in Wayne State University, the Detroit Medical Center and cultural institutions such as the Detroit Institute of Arts and Orchestra Hall, as well as a growing number of startups and rehabilitation projects, and people are moving in thanks to relocation incentives offered by their employers.

It’s a hip, bright spot in a city that narrowly avoided a state takeover last week when Mayor Dave Bing, the City Council and Gov. Rick Snyder agreed on a deal giving the state input on Detroit’s finances and long-term fiscal restructuring. The city’s budget deficit is about $200 million. Long-term structural debt is slightly more than $13 billion, and the city’s unemployment rate is among the highest in the country.

“This is the one area (in Detroit) that has a different demographic — more upscale, more youth, more students. It’s a great concentration of people,” said Kenneth Dalto, a Michigan retail analyst. “They are buying into the plans of Detroit to grow the corridor.”

Whole Foods Market Inc. had been in talks to bring a store to Detroit for several years when it began looking at Midtown in 2010. The company has said it has built relationships with Michigan farmers and feels it could offer something to Detroiters, who have long complained about having few places to buy fresh fruit, vegetables and produce.

Whole Foods co-Chief Executive Walter Robb told local business leaders Friday that he likes the city’s resiliency.

“This is going to be a whole Whole Foods store. You’re getting our ‘A’ game here,” he told the Detroit Economic Club. “You’re not going to get anything less than our very best.”

The grocery chain has something in common with Detroit: battling adversity. It was hit hard during the recent recession and revamped itself by cutting costs, slowing growth and carrying more lower-priced foods.

Dalto said that last move will prove critical in Midtown, where the demographic mix includes plenty of 20-somethings who don’t yet have the pocketbooks or palates for gourmet foods. He expects the store’s selection will tilt a little more in favor of necessities and brands younger people grew up with.

“They’re going to go lighter on some of the gourmet stuff … and (stock) more brand names than names nobody has heard of or things that are overly expensive,” he predicted.

Whole Foods can learn lessons from Zaccaro’s Market, an independent gourmet grocer that opened in Midtown in April 2008 and closed less than a year later.

Click HERE to read the rest of this article on Time!
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