The Huffington Post

After launching its newest ads for the Pure Michigan tourism campaign earlier this month, the state tourism group Travel Michigan and the Michigan Economic Development Corporation revealed the campaign brought in a record $1 billion dollars for state businesses last year.

And on Monday, the state announced a new advertising partnership with Coca Cola, which will include idyllic Michigan scenery plastered all over Coca Cola trucks and vending machines, as well as involvement in the MyCokeRewards program. According to Crain's Detroit, Michigan isn't spending a penny for the partnership.

Toronto-based firm Longwoods International used an online survey to compile data about tourists' spending and perception of Michigan. The 2011 Pure Michigan campaign cost $14.3 million, and according to Michigan Radio, it brought back $4.90 in taxes for each tax dollar spent. It also brought in a record number of out-of-state visitors, 3.2 million, compared to 2 million in 2010.

According to the Longwoods survey, outsiders see a variety of strengths in Michigan, including "beautiful fall colors," being "great for water sports," and the ever-important "not too far away."

But Michigan still isn't seen as a destination for arts and culture, according to the survey -- so we ask, where's the Pure Michigan campaign repping the Detroit Institute of Arts, Charles H. Wright Museum of African American History, the Museum of Contemporary Art Detroit and the Cranbrook Institute of Art?

Don't worry, Pure Michigan has it covered: "Say hello to Michigan, where creativity is spilling onto the streets and stages," a radio ad goes. "There's something about the nature of Michigan that makes the art more approachable, the music more soulful and the people more in-tune."

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By Nick Timiraos

Home prices fell to new lows in January, but the rate of decline appears to be easing, offering the latest sign that an elusive bottom in prices could be in sight. Prices dropped by 0.8% for the three-month period ending in January, according to the Standard & Poor's/Case-Shiller index that tracks 20 metro areas.

While that dropped the index back to levels not seen since the end of 2002, the monthly decline improved from a drop of 1.1% in December and 1.3% in November. Separately, U.S. consumers in March remain confident about the economy and labor markets generally, but a ...

Click HERE to read the full article in The Wall Street Journal!
Honor & Folly's living area offers a fully stocked kitchen for guests to use.  


The Five-Point Weekend Escape Plan
Discover Urban Renewal in Detroit

A wave of nonprofits and food-focused locals is revitalizing once-abandoned neighborhoods with urban farms, public art projects, and locavore restaurants. 
By Edna Ishayik 

Get a taste of the roaring twenties at the venerable Book Cadillac Hotel (from $169), a Westin property that debuted in 1924 and reopened in 2008 after nearly twenty years of abandonment. With 453 rooms and suites, you’ll find more space here than at other chains, and its Michael Symon-helmed restaurant Roast hosts one of the city’s better happy hours, where seasonal dishes like veal sweetbreads with apples and celery are deeply discounted.

Feel at home in one of Honor & Folly’s two bedrooms (from $165) on the second floor of a carefully rehabilitated two-story building with exposed brick walls and salvaged colored-glass windows. Run by travel blogger Meghan McEwen of DesignTripper, the B&B is decorated with creative accents from vintage suitcases to needlepoint pillows (all made in Detroit or by nearby Midwestern artisans) and nearly everything can be purchased. Be sure to borrow the house vintage bikes to cruise around the up-and-coming neighborhood of Corktown.

Sleep in Victorian style at The Inn on Ferry Street (from $139), comprised of 40 rooms spread across six grand homes and carriage houses from the late nineteenth century. You’ll find vintage details like four-poster beds and carved wooden staircases throughout; request room 2203 in the Roehm House to enjoy the building's original cast-iron tub.

Click HERE to read the full article in New York Magazine!
A person dressed as the "red dwarf" appears at the pre-march gathering to taunt all of those gathered at the Marche du Nain Rouge in the Cass Corridor in Detroit, on Sunday, March 25, 2012. More than 3,000 people turned out for ther third annual parade intended to rid Detroit of a spell cast by a red dwarf who was struck by a cane by a famous pioneer centuries ago, Antoine Cadillac. Or so the story goes. Photo: The Detroit News, Robin Buckson / AP
A person dressed as the "red dwarf" appears at the pre-march gathering to taunt all of those gathered at the Marche du Nain Rouge in the Cass Corridor in Detroit, on Sunday, March 25, 2012. More than 3,000 people turned out for ther third annual parade intended to rid Detroit of a spell cast by a red dwarf who was struck by a cane by a famous pioneer centuries ago, Antoine Cadillac. Or so the story goes. (The Detroit News, Robin Buckson / AP)



Associated Press

Some 3,000 people in masks, feathers and beads turned out Sunday for a third annual light-hearted parade to rid Detroit of that devil and his cruel intentions. People who thought force might be necessary carried pitchforks. Shari Lombardo of Grosse Pointe dressed her dog in a tutu.

"I read on the (event) website that anything goes; that's obviously true," Lombardo told The Detroit News (http://bit.ly/GPAfoH). "Anything that's new and different is good for the city."

The tale goes that a red dwarf cast a spell on Detroit 300 years ago after being struck with a cane by one of the city's founders, Antoine Cadillac. A man dressed as the feared dwarf taunted spectators by declaring, "I own this town."

"Do you think this silly parade is going to get rid of me?" he said before being lowered to a stage from a crane.

Detroit lately has been taking its lumps. City and state officials are trying to strike a deal to manage Detroit's poor finances. Mayor Dave Bing is recovering from surgery on a perforated intestine. He was hospitalized Thursday — just three days before the parade.

Organizer Peter Van Dyke said plans already are in the works for future events. "We plan to keep this going for a very long time," he said.

Buddy’s Pizza solidified its shape as Detroit’s original square pizza 66 years ago. But the family-owned pizzeria, with nine locations across the metropolitan Detroit area, has also made a name for itself in the business of giving back.

For the past 36 years Buddy’s Pizza has paired up with the Capuchin Soup Kitchen to help feed hungry people and support the agency’s other programs. On Monday, April 16, 2012, all Buddy’s locations will again host its annual Slice for Life charity event.

Owner Robert Jacobs noted that the partnership between Buddy’s Pizza and the Capuchin Soup Kitchen was driven entirely by Buddy’s employees. “It began as an effort to shine a spotlight on Capuchin Soup Kitchen and to assist those in need throughout the metro Detroit area,” said Jacobs. “Over the years Buddy’s Pizza has hosted its Slice for Life benefit, the Capuchin Soup Kitchen has expanded its services to the community."

Since its start, the Slice for Life event has helped raise more than $2.5 million dollars to support the Capuchin Soup Kitchen. The agency tends to people’s basic needs—especially the need for food—but all its programs strive to stimulate minds, nourish spirits and address root causes of social injustice. Included in those programs are two sites that serve daily hot meals, a bakery where men learn a trade after leaving prison or a treatment program, a shower facility for people who lack opportunity to bathe elsewhere, a food pantry, a clothing center, a children’s tutoring and art therapy program, substance abuse treatment, and Earthworks (an organic urban farm). This year’s goal is $100,000.

“The annual Buddy’s Slice for Life day is eagerly anticipated by Capuchin Soup Kitchen staff and volunteers, and for many is their favorite fundraiser of the year,” said Br. Jerry Smith, executive director of the Capuchin Soup Kitchen. “The financial benefits are obvious. Every year the event raises many thousands of dollars for the Soup Kitchen’s general fund, which enables us in turn to feed thousands of people and provide them an array of other services.

“The one-day ‘party’ spotlights our partnership with Buddy’s, but a lesser known fact is that every week of the year Buddy’s provides the Soup Kitchen with dozens of pizzas that are then included in the food packages distributed by our emergency food pantry. They are a special treat much enjoyed by the recipients.”

From 11 a.m. to 10 p.m. on April 16, pizza fans have a chance to support all of those initiatives. Slice for Life ticket holders may choose to dine in to enjoy all-you-can-eat two-topping pizzas and salad or carry out a 4-square two-topping pizza or a medium sized Antipasto, Greek or house salad. Buddy’s Pizza has locations in Detroit, Auburn Hills, Dearborn, Livonia, Warren, Farmington Hills, Grosse Pointe, and carry-out only locations in Bloomfield Hills and Royal Oak. Maps and locations can be found at www.buddyspizza.com.

Tickets, $15 for adults and $6 for children, may be purchased in advance by calling (313) 579-2100 ext. 170 or buy them at the door of any Buddy’s Pizza location on April 16. With every adult ticket purchased, patrons will receive a $3 off coupon for an 8 square pizza. All participants may also register to win one 8-square Buddy’s Pizza every month for one year.
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