Detroit Bike City is Detroit’s first annual bicycle show and swap meet.

Offering 100+ vendors from all over the Midwest the opportunity to show, sell and swap bicycles, parts and everything bikes. Bringing together the whole community with all forms of bicycles from road and racing to mountain and BMX, Detroit Bike City has something the enthusiast or casual rider can enjoy, plus a full day of bicycle activities and demos for the whole family.

A real chance to get some great deals, be sure to come out to Detroit Bike City to buy, sell, swap and browse.

Admission is $8 and is free for kids under 12 Individuals are welcome to bring in small items for trade i.e. a hub or pedals (anything other than complete bikes, frames/sets, or wheels) at no additional cost to admission. Individuals wishing to sell and/or swap complete bikes, frame sets, or wheels please refer to the vendor information packet.

Detroit Bike City
March 24, 2012 from 10:00 am–6:00 pm
The Michigan Hall at COBO Center
1 Washington Blvd, Detroit, MI 48226

For more information: www.detroitbikecity.org info@detroitbikecity.org
quigley rolling stone building


Jennifer Quigley's 'Rolling Stone' Building in Detroit Artist covers facade of building with magazine covers


Artist Jennifer Quigley recently covered the facade of a building on Michigan Avenue in Detroit with a collage comprised of Rolling Stone magazine covers. "I've had a Rolling Stone subscription most of my life," says Quigley. "I first began collaging with Rolling Stone thanks to my disdain for the horrible wood paneling that was in my rec room in high school. I covered every inch of that torrential wood paneling with three years' worth of my Rolling Stone subscription collection."


"The same thing happened with this building, which is on Michigan Avenue, two doors down from the old Tigers Stadium," Quigley tells Rolling Stone. "It was bought by a friend of mine who is waiting on his loan. He got it right before the economy tanked and there's a lot of small businesses in Detroit that cannot get their loans for renovations." 

Click HERE to read more (and see photos) of Jennifer's project in Rolling Stone! 
Atlantic Cities
Eric Jaffe

When a city's transit agency gets into funding trouble, it's easy to call on the private sector to whip things into cost-efficient shape. Of course, actually running a private urban transit company — rather, running a successful one — is a lot tougher than it may seem.

 While the private sector can cut transit costs on the order of 5 to 19 percent, the result is usually "less service and higher fares than socially optimal," transit scholar Todd Litman wrote early last year [PDF]. A recent case in point: a few weeks ago, just months after taking over the Long Island Bus from New York City's transit authority, the private company Veolia announced $7.2 million in service cuts.

That's not to say a private transit program is never worth the effort, and if there were ever a time and place for a bold attempt at transit reform, it's right now in Detroit.

The city's badly strapped bus system recently halted late-night service (between 1 and 4 a.m.) and even cut off some routes at 8 p.m. Those buses that do run rarely show up on schedule, and 20 to 50 percent never show at all, according to a recent report. In one horror story, riders waited three hours for a bus to arrive, only to find it too packed to board. Detroit riders, understandably, are furious.

Earlier this year Andy Didorosi, a young entrepreneur and lifetime Detroiter, decided he'd heard enough. In January he bought three buses and began to organize the Detroit Bus Company — a private transit operation he hopes can pick up where the city's bus system has left off. The company is completing its regulatory papers now and expects to start service in late April.

"The whole thing was born out of listening to all these solutions we had for Detroit's transit woes come and go," says the 25-year-old Didorosi. "You hear about these over and over and over again and your thought is: why doesn't someone just give it a shot?

The Detroit Bus Company is starting deliberately small. Its launch line will be a circulator route that loops through the neighborhoods of Corktown, Woodbridge, Midtown, Eastern Market, Greektown, via the downtown core. Didorosi plans to run the route with just a single bus at first and a limited schedule that reclaims many hours cut by the city: weeknights (6 p.m. to 3 a.m.) and all-day weekends.

Click HERE to read the rest of this article on Atlantic Cities!
Jessica Strachan and Dan Morrison
ModelD

Here at Detroit4Detroit, we know it’s more than Ford, General Motors and Chrysler that drive the Motor City.

It’s the citizens and the passion they bring to the city they love.

This is a story of three Detroiters. They have never met, but they are now all connected through their Detroit4Detroit projects to support the Detroit Area Pre-College Engineering Program (DAPCEP) and their commitment to education. One grew up and lives within 8 mile. One is a local from the 'burbs. And, the third is a Detroit "expat" currently living in Washington D.C. They’ve each decided to use their connection to the city in a powerful way.

Krystal L. grew up within Detroit’s city limits and attended its schools. Detroit shaped her and made her who she is. When it came time, she went off to Central Michigan University (CMU) to study business and then moved to Atlanta for a while. She even journeyed to South Korea as an English teacher. But now, she’s back in her hometown and has another lesson plan on her agenda.

"Detroit is a city built around technology, like robotics, and it’s important to have students be cultivated to go into those types of programs. Some of the best jobs are in those fields," Krystal, 30, says.

She recently joined the Detroit4Detroit movement as a Citizen Philanthropist. It is her way to jump right back into the city and see an immediate impact where it counts. She is leading a DAPCEP project that will help Detroit’s young techies become the next generation of engineers. "Especially in urban schools, for kids to believe that they can participate in (the sciences) and to believe they can work on those fields, is great," she says.

Click HERE to read the full article on ModelD!


Click HERE to check out Noah's Photography!
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