Burton Theatre to Reopen in Midtown Detroit This Weekend!



On Saturday, October 29th 2011 The Burton Center for the Arts is pleased to announce that the Burton Theatre will be reopened under new management as the Cass City Cinema for a Halloween Movie Marathon!  The marathon will run from Saturday, October 29th until Monday, October 31st featuring 1950’s Japanese horror films, the cult classic midnight showing of The Night of the Living Dead, and Guy Maddin’s critically acclaimed take on Bram Stoker’s Dracula.

Cass City Cinema is committed to featuring innovative independent films & much-loved classic films and developing a community-gathering space for all community members.  Owner of Burton Center for the Arts, Joel Landy, stated, “We are really excited to be reopening the theatre.  The schedule that we are lining up will have a dynamic broad based program to serve all moviegoers tastes and desires.”  

Cass City Cinema will be featuring several promotions throughout the course of the weekend, please check our Facebook Page for further information.  Moviegoers pay $5.00 for the all-day Halloween weekend movie marathon.  Children under 12 always pay $3.50.

SATURDAY, OCTOBER 29TH
2:00 p.m.    Spooks Run Wild (United States, 1941)
3:25 p.m.    Monster from a Prehistoric Planet (Japan, 1967)
5:15 p.m.    A Bucket of Blood (United States, 1959)
6:41 p.m.    Dementia 13 (United States, 1963)
8:15 p.m.    Dracula: Pages from a Virgin’s Diary (Canada, 2002)
10:00 p.m.    Lady Frankenstein (Italian, 1971)
11:30 p.m.    Night of the Living Dead (United States, 1968)


SUNDAY, OCTOBER 30TH
2:00 p.m.    Ghosts on the Loose (United States, 1943)
3:25 p.m.    Gamera vs Zigra (Japan, 1971)
5:15 p.m.    The Terror (United States, 1963)
7:00 p.m.    The Ape Man (United States, 1943)
8:20 p.m.    Dracula: Pages from a Virgin’s Diary (Canada, 2002)
10:00 p.m.    Silent Night, Bloody Night (1973)


MONDAY, OCTOBER 31ST
6:00 p.m.    I Bury the Living (United States, 1958)
7:45 p.m.    Dracula: Pages from a Virgin’s Diary (Canada, 2002)
9:20 p.m.     Count Dracula and His Vampire Bride (United Kingdom, 1973)


Cass City Cinema is located at the Burton Theater at 3420 Cass, Detroit, Michigan 48201. 
Visit our website at www.casscitycinema.com

Barbara De Lollis
 USA TODAY

Excerpt:

It's Detroit, however, that TravelClick predicts will emerge the biggest winner during this period, with an expected 22% increase in occupancy.

"We're well ahead of the curve from a national improvement standpoint," says Thomas Conran, principal of Greenwood Hospitality Group, owner of The Henry hotel in Dearborn, Mich., a Detroit suburb.

Reflecting Detroit's economy, the Henry had previously been a luxury Ritz-Carlton hotel where the auto industry frequently met and had functions, but Conran's group repositioned it last year. Out were the dark-wood-covered walls that gave the hotel its clubby atmosphere. In were a lighter color palette, a vibrant restaurant, reduced room rates and marketing by Marriott's "anti-chain" Autograph Collection. On busy mid-week nights, a guest might today pay about $200 a night — less than during the auto industry's heyday.

But what the Henry lost in rate, it's starting to make up with volume. "There's an energy that this hotel has not seen for many, many years," says Conran.

Conran credits Detroit's recent recovery to the state's efforts to lure more leisure travelers via its Michigan.org website, as well as the success of Detroit's resurgent sports teams, which has helped lure weekend visitors.

Finally, Conran says, the Detroit area is seeing "significant" year-over-year gains in business travel thanks to the recovering auto industry.

"We can't underestimate the fact that the health of the auto industry has improved dramatically," Conran says.

Click HERE to read the full article!

Linda Yablonsky
W Magazine

Detroit is one of America’s most cash-strapped cities. But as Linda Yablonsky discovers, it has also become a rich breeding ground for a new generation of artists.

Five years ago, the painter Hernan Bas told me he was moving from Miami to Detroit. I couldn’t imagine why. “Because,” he said, “Detroit is the city of tomorrow.” I laughed out loud. A month later, I found myself there on an overnight trip with three friends from New York. The Museum of Contemporary Art Detroit ­(MOCAD) had just opened, and we wanted to see it. We also saw Detroit.

The city that once changed the world by giving it the car was now an enormous junker, its parts scattered and its bumpers battered but its engine still running. We saw a street full of rotting houses with polka dots on the shingles and stuffed animals hanging from the windows, a big bronze fist commemorating Joe Louis, and the vast remains of the Packard plant, which looked as if a neutron bomb had dropped on it. We saw palatial mansions, many boarded up, and regal Art Deco skyscrapers—as well as single-family homes standing amid acres of neglected land from which entire neighborhoods had vanished.

Finally, we passed the old Michigan Central train station, an 18-story ruin of Beaux Arts magisterial grandeur. It haunted me then, and it haunts me now, along with the rest of this consternating, spellbinding, tragic town—the most fascinating city in the country. In what other American metropolis could a private citizen own a bridge to Canada? Where else is there a major industrial center with yawning prairies in its midst? And where, but in Detroit, could an artist rent a steel mill for two months and transform it into a giant sculpture on view for a single day?

“This town has a magic,” said Chido Johnson, 42, a sculptor I met during my week long stay this summer, my third trip there in a year. Johnson, who was born in Zimbabwe, arrived nine years ago and never looked back. “I grew up in a war zone,” he said, “so Detroit felt familiar right off. The first week I was here, I walked into the public library, and there was a calypso band playing. Can you imagine?”

Bas felt the magic when he bought his five-bedroom house for $150,000—roughly the price of one of his paintings. Matthew Barney felt it when he commandeered the steel mill for the fiery finale to an epic eight-hour performance about the life and death of a Chrysler Imperial. Photographers feel it whenever they come for spectacular pictures that locals deride as “ruin porn.”

It is not an easy place to reckon with or to understand—for one thing, the scale of decay is astounding. Yet Detroit is attracting artists in numbers large enough to earn it a designation as another Berlin: a city with a struggling economy where creative types can live and work cheaply—and where, like Barney, they can realize projects that would be impossible most anywhere else. In Berlin, though, artists pursue international careers; in Detroit, they speak only to Detroit—because, they say, anywhere else they would just be making art. In Detroit, they can make a difference.





Click HERE to read the rest of this article!
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