Photo: John Manno
Vogue Magazine

You can take it with you. . . .

What: The Perfect Picnic, a brand-new boutique company delivers locally sourced picnics anywhere in the city, whether you’re planning a night at the Met Opera in the Park, spending the day on Governors Island (they will meet you at the ferry), or simply dining al fresco on your roof deck. They can also provide a perfect platter of artisanal cheeses and cured meats for a pre-dinner party hors d’oeuvre, or put together a delightful Hamptons hostess-gift basket.
  • Where: 9 Clinton Street, Lower East Side
  • When: Available now
  • Details: Gift baskets from $50, 212.228.2884; perfectpicnicnyc.com



For the full list, click HERE!

City Dubs June 23 Buddy’s Pizza Day in Detroit!

A Detroit original celebrates 65 years with Motor City Pizza Collection, customer appreciation deals and Kid Rock specialty pizza.

Buddy’s Pizza has long been a Detroit original. After 65 years in business, the restaurant that created the first square deep dish has a day to call it’s own.

June 23 is Buddy’s Pizza Day in Detroit. Detroit City Council President Charles Pugh made it official by presenting a resolution to Robert Jacobs, owner of Buddy’s Pizza, at the restaurant’s original location.

“Today is a celebration of our history, our city and our longstanding support of Detroit’s arts and culture,” said Jacobs. “We’re so proud to call this Buddy’s Pizza Day in Detroit.”

The mayor’s office issued a proclamation supporting the day, signed by Detroit Mayor Dave Bing. Then, Buddy’s Pizza presented some news of their own. Jacobs unveiled the Motor City Pizza Collection, four new pizzas on the Buddy’s menu which are each associated with and benefiting a non-profit cultural institution in the metro Detroit area.

Each pizza features the original Buddy’s crust and a Motor City Cheese Blend of Fontinella, Asiago and brick cheeses. They include:

·         The Detroit Institute of Arts – Topped with spinach and artichoke blend, capers, roasted tomatoes, parmesan and served with a fresh lemon wedge.

·         The Henry Ford – Topped with red onion, seasoned ground beef, smoked bacon, bleu cheese, tomato basil sauce and parmesan.

·         The Parade Company – Topped with fresh carrots, sliced grape tomatoes, tomato basil sauce and parmesan

·         The Detroit Zoo – Topped with fresh basil, pine nuts and tomato basil sauce.

When customers purchase any of these pizzas from the menu, Buddy’s will donate $1 will to the non-profit institution throughout 2011. To show their collective support of the Motor City Pizza Collection, Director Ron Kagan of the Detroit Zoo; Annmarie Erickson, executive vice president of planning and administration at the DIA; Christian Overland, executive vice president of The Henry Ford and President and CEO Tony Michaels of Parade Company, which produces America’s Thanksgiving Day Parade were on hand June 23 to celebrate Buddy’s Pizza Day in Detroit.

“We recognize that there is a strong and growing need for support of the arts in our community,” said Jacobs. “This was just another way for us to collaborate with and reach out to organizations we believe in, and partner with already. We hope in some small way it helps to raise awareness of the fine art and cultural offerings we have here, and inspires our customers to protect them.”

Buddy’s Pizza is always willing to experiment with new recipes. That was the case when the original 6 Mile location began selling Kid Rock’s American Badass beer. Not only will you find the lager behind the bar, you can taste it incorporated into the famous crust of Buddy’s own Kid Rock’s Badass Detroiter pizza. A true celebration of Detroit in time for the restaurant’s 65th anniversary, the rocker was kind enough to lend his name and beer to the new menu offering.

“It doesn’t get much more Detroit than Kid Rock, and that was the pure inspiration behind the Kid Rock’s Badass Detroiter pizza,” said Jacobs. “We’re so pleased to know he’s a fan of Buddy’s and we’re so proud of his success. We certainly share an immense amount of Detroit pride.”

Buddy’s Pizza intends to share that pride with their customers throughout this, its 65th anniversary year. The restaurant is offering customer cards with monthly deals. Once a month through December 15 cardholders can purchase an 8-square cheese pizza for $6.50 and add extra toppings for 65 cents each.

Charge Those Phones, Cameras, Laptops and iPads! 


This year’s theme is Detroit Rock City!

We’ll celebrate all things Social Media while focusing on everything great about the Motor City.  There’ll be special guest DJ’s funky-ing up the joint, a tweeting Ford Fiesta (featuring the new Livio Car Internet Radio app), oh and the Detroit Red Wings and Detroit Tigers Social Media crews will be stopping by along with Special Celebrity Skype-Ins!

Only 1,000 tickets are available! Last year’s event sold out early and this year’s is on its way!
Details:
  • Each Winner Receives Their Very Own Hotel Room At the MotorCity Casino Hotel!
You Must Sign Up As a Dater By Sunday,  June 26th 2011!

Voting Begins at 9am Monday, June 27th!

Directions To Register:

1. Go to http://pickmidate.com
2. Click on the “Register To Date” Button
3. Fill Out The Most Hilarious Dating Form Online
4. Click “Submit”

Presented by the Detroit RiverFront Conservancy, the 5th Annual River Days is a one-of-a-kind festival taking place along the Detroit Riverfront – from the new Detroit/Wayne County Port Authority Terminal Dock, just west of the GM Renaissance Center, to Rivard Plaza and the William G. Milliken State Park. The festival takes place Thursday, June 23- Sunday, June 26, 2011. River Days is a celebration of Detroit’s RiverWalk with activities on land and water. Experience all the RiverWalk has to offer, from the tall ships, jet-ski demos and riverboat tours to live music, sand sculptures, bike tours, kids activities, delicious eats and much more!

Admission to River Days is $3 to support the non-profit Conservancy, but everyone has an opportunity to take advantage of the Ambassador Bridge Company's Free Friday promotion. Admission to the festival is also free on Thursday. Click HERE to learn more.

Event Map Available for Download HERE


The Atlantic
By Kaid Benfield

We're often told that Detroit has been abandoned—but the metro area is stable, and addressing sprawl is still a challenge.

At the bottom of this post are two short videos about Detroit, both featuring architect and planner Mark Nickita, principal of the city's Archive Design Studio and a lifelong Detroit resident. In a very refreshing change from the mind-numbing negativity one usually hears about the city, Nickita is upbeat and hopeful. His point of view, emphasizing revitalization, is much closer to my own than much of what I read, which effectively takes the approach that the city has somehow been abandoned beyond redemption, leaving the only question how to manage its more-or-less permanent shrinkage.

But it's not that simple.

There has indeed been a decline in part of the region. In 1970, 1,670,144 people lived within the city limits of Detroit. By 2010, that number had declined to 713,777, an astounding apparent loss of some 57 percent of the 1970 population. Recently, much has been made the 25 percent population decline over the last decade, from 2000 (951,270) to 2010.

But the extent to which Detroit is such a tragically "shrinking city" depends on your definition of "city." The population of metropolitan Detroit—the jurisdictional inner city and its immediate suburbs—did decline from 1970 to 2010, but only from 4,490,902 to 4,296,250, a loss of only 4 percent. Big difference.



Do the math: What that means is that, while the inner city's population was declining so drastically, its suburbs added some 761,000 people, growing at the handsome rate of 27 percent. (In the most recent decade of 2000-2010, the suburbs added some 91,000 people, or between 2 and 3 percent.) Patrick Cooper-McCann writes on his blog Rethink Detroit that, far from shrinking, the physical size of metro Detroit grew by 50 percent in those 40 years. As I've written before, neither the economy nor the environment pay attention to jurisdictional lines; neither should analysts.

Click HERE to read the rest of this article!

Detroit Coney Dogs, Faygo, and Strohs Invade LA

Los AngelesTimes

In search of a Coney Island hot dog taste-a-like on the West Coast, continuous disappointment drove a group of hungry, Coney dog fiend-ing ex-Detroiters to bring their treasured, childhood staple to L.A. (In case you haven't figured it out, Coney Dogs are a beloved mainstay in Michigan and especially the Detroit area.)

Coney Dog opens today on Sunset Boulevard in West Hollywood and we'll be frank: these people are serious about their chili dogs. Steamed buns, anyone? Customers will be relieved to know that what makes up these dogs is no mystery. 80% pure ground beef and 20% pork, the Coney dogs contain no added fats, parts, fillers or thickeners. The chili is custom made and shipped from Detroit unless you prefer vegetarian which is homemade daily.

8873 Sunset Blvd., West Hollywood, 310-854-1172, coneydogla.com
New York Post
By Nicole Rupersburg

In most cities, the opening of a youth hostel might not be all that big a deal. But Detroit isn't most cities, and in an era when most of the news is bad, new things, positive things — well, the locals pay attention.

A lot of it was about being in the right place at the right time. Hostel Detroit (it sounds like the title of an upcoming Eli Roth movie, but it's really not) made its debut this spring in Corktown, Detroit's oldest neighborhood. Once a bastion of traditional Irish-American culture, Corktown has become a place to see Detroit at its coolest.

In this historic section of the city, settled nearly 200 years ago, you can see a Detroit that is on the verge not just of renewal, but also in the process of forging a whole new identity. In a town that most people identify with the old lunchpail, punch in, punch out mentality, an explosion of DIY is leading Corktown (and the city at large) into the future.

Here, you can now see artists working to re-appropriate forgotten spaces as public art. You have urban farmers making productive use of vacant land, taking the idea of eating local to the extreme. You have the city's most talked-about restaurant (an excellent barbecue joint), a record store, a Martiniquais (by way of Paris, Brazil and Brooklyn) making crepes, a cool little vintage boutique, two brothers selling freshly-made bagels out of their apartment, a sustainable food truck and, soon, a speakeasy-style cocktail lounge and a third-wave coffee bar.

And then there’s the occasional energetic redhead, brimming with enthusiasm, who decides to open a youth hostel.

“I was hosting a lot of couch surfers,” says Emily Doerr, a neighborhood resident who dreamed up the hostel idea and made it a reality. “I had 100 strangers coming in and out and thought, you know what?”

Doerr found a building, on a desolate (or quiet, depending whom you ask) block of North Corktown. She worked with business advocates, city inspectors and hordes of tireless volunteers (who are all honored on a plaque at the hostel’s entrance) to formed the nonprofit’s board of directors. It opened its doors within six months.

“There’s a lot of for-profit hostels but I didn’t want to be for-profit,” she explains. “I wanted it to serve the community and be of the community, that way everybody knows I’m not making a dime off this. This is very much a thing we’re doing to help Detroit and show people what there is here.”

They provide affordable private-room and dorm-style lodging with easy access to public buses. They will also offer ambassador programs for out-of-town guests.

Kristyn Koth of the Pink FlaminGO is no stranger to the do-it-yourself concept either. Last summer when the US Social Forum had its summit in Detroit, hundreds of hungry campers were sleeping outside in vacant lots by her home. She already had the retro shiny silver Airstream, so she started serving food and never stopped.

Click HERE for the full article!
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