Nemos Makes the Top 10 Sports Bars in the U.S.

Gayot: The Guide to Good Life

Nemo's Bar & Grill Restaurant
1384 Michigan Ave. (Eighth St.)
Detroit, MI 48226
313-965-3180 |

It used to be a family could stop for a meal here, then walk to Tiger Stadium for a baseball game. Sadly, the Tigers have moved to Comerica Park on the other side of downtown, but Nemo's now arranges buses to the games, as well as to Lions football, Red Wings hockey games, and other major concert and entertainment events. Customers appreciate that kind of service, as well as one of the better burgers in town. The antique-y setting, sports memorabilia-laden décor and completely unpretentious atmosphere have been a winning combination for years under the Springstead family. The menu also includes other basics like chili and homemade soups, and throwbacks like liverwurst sandwiches. Sports fans continue to flock to what is a true Detroit classic.

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Photo: Tatiana Arbogast  
Grub Street Los Angeles 

Now that we have bagels from Brooklyn, tacos from Chicago, and Chinese food from San Francisco, maybe it's time for Detroit to get in on our rapidly growing sausage party. Coming this May to Sunset Blvd., across the street from The Whiskey, Coney Dog is bringing Detroit-style hot dogs, burgers, fries, craft beer, and for true Motor City madmen, bottles of Faygo, to West Hollywood. Yes, this is basically a little like Sonny McClean's Bostonian refuge, only with Detroit exiles in mind. So, what's with the name?

The business seeks to provide a den of nostalgia for those missing Michigan's Greek-influenced American Coney Island hot dogs. The popular special here is usually a chili dog and Coney's Facebook page shows the gang preparing to take on Tommy's with one of their own. Good luck guys. After all, even though we have enough regional transplant action for a few years, who isn't rooting for Detroit?

Coney Dog, 8873 Sunset Blvd. West Hollywood.
Meet the 'New' Motor City
Once-Insular City's Business Climate Warms to Outsiders -- and Green Shoots Are Starting to Show


David Kiley
Advertising Age

On a recent morning at Zuma's Coffee Shop, an independently owned joint in the affluent Detroit suburb of Birmingham, a man in his mid 40s wearing jeans and a casual shirt sits in a windowless alcove hunched over his iPad, a BlackBerry on the table and a briefcase at his side. It's about 38 degrees, warm enough to melt the stubborn March snow cleaving to the roadsides -- sweater weather at worst for a native Michigander. Yet the man is clad in a down coat even inside the café.

It's Joel Ewanick, GM's global marketing chief, on the job in Detroit for 10 months and no Michigan native, having left the more seasonable climes of Southern California at Hyundai, with a brief stop at Nissan in Nashville, Tenn., before accepting a move to Detroit that he had previously resisted.

Mr. Ewanick comes to this often empty alcove at Zuma's "to get some work done and to think," he said, before making the 25-mile trek from his home in Bloomfield Hills south to General Motors' glass and steel edifice on the Detroit River. Mr. Ewanick, who went from having only marketing responsibility for GM's North American operation to the whole world two months ago, said he often tries to stay outside the office -- known as "the tubes" around Detroit because of the multiple-cylinders configuration of the building -- and has to ration his meetings "or the important work is not going to get done."

That important work is marketing the post-bankruptcy GM that is still 40% owned by the U.S. Treasury. That job, and that of reshaping the new Chrysler and surging Ford, is increasingly being done by newcomers and outsiders such as Mr. Ewanick who are re-energizing the "new" Detroit, where creative green shoots are once again springing up. Among them at GM: CEO Daniel Akerson from the Carlyle Group; North American marketing head Chris Perry from Hyundai; Goodby Silverstein & Partners CEO Jeff Goodby, who has been leading Chevrolet creative since last summer; and Chairman Pat Fallon of Fallon Worldwide, Minneapolis, which now handles Cadillac. Also new to town: Chrysler CEO Sergio Marchionne and chief marketer Olivier Francois from Italian automaker Fiat; Chrysler agencies Wieden & Kennedy and Richards Group from Oregon and Texas, respectively. And perhaps most prominently, Ford CEO Alan Mulally from Boeing Co. and his chief global marketing executive, James Farley, from Toyota.

"There is still a lot of money here," said Toby Barlow, chief creative officer at Team Detroit, who is speaking at Ad Age's Idea Detroit Conference this week. "The auto companies are back, and they have some of the biggest budgets, and good people and good ideas and creativity will come to where the money is." Mr. Barlow himself is an outsider who arrived almost five years ago from New York and San Francisco before that.

Some of the outsiders are laying down roots; some are transient. Mr. Barlow, for example, lives in Lafayette Park in downtown Detroit and is a frequent megaphone of creative possibilities and business opportunities around the city. He also published a novel, "Sharp Teeth," in 2008, which is being developed into a movie by "Slumdog Millionaire" director Danny Boyle.

Click HERE to read the rest of this very positive Detroit article!
 Navy Names Littoral Combat Ships Milwaukee and Detroit
U.S Department of Defense

Secretary of the Navy Ray Mabus announced Friday that the next two Freedom-class littoral combat ships (LCS) to be built in Wisconsin will be named the USS Milwaukee and the USS Detroit.

These two ships are part of a dual block buy of LCS class ships announced by Mabus in December 2010.  By procuring both versions of the LCS – Lockheed Martin’s semiplaning monohull and General Dynamic’s aluminum trimaran – the Navy can stabilize the LCS program and the industrial base with an award of 20 ships; increase ship procurement rate to support operational requirements; sustain competition through the program; and enhance foreign military sales opportunities.  Both designs meet the Navy’s LCS requirement.  However, the diversity provided by two designs provides operational flexibility.

Milwaukee and Detroit will be designed to defeat growing littoral threats and provide access and dominance in the coastal waters.  A fast, agile surface combatant, the LCS provides the required war fighting capabilities and operational flexibility to execute focused missions close to the shore such as mine warfare, anti-submarine warfare and surface warfare.

The Milwaukee and Detroit will be 378 feet in length, have a waterline beam of 57 feet, displace approximately 3,000 tons, and will make speed in excess of 40 knots.

Construction of Milwaukee and Detroit will be by a Lockheed Martin led industry team in Marinette, Wis.

The selection of Milwaukee, designated LCS 5, honors the city’s citizens and their continued support to our nation’s military.  Milwaukee has been a city of national pride since its official founding in 1846.  This makes the sixth ship to bear the city’s name.

The selection of Detroit, designated LCS 7, honors the citizens of the Motor City and their ongoing patriotic spirit and military support.  Detroit is a major port city on the Detroit River in the state of Michigan.  It was founded on July 24, 1701.  Detroit is the seventh ship to bear the city’s name.
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