The Live Feed

Titled "187 Detroit," the pilot marks ABC's first drama pickup that will be in the running for next season. "Detroit" is shot in the style of a fictional documentary crew following a top homicide division and has a realistic yet sometimes humorous tone.

"Detroit" is produced by ABC Studios and Mandeville, executive produced by Jason Richman, David Hoberman and Todd Lieberman. ABC has been one of the more aggressive networks in getting development ready for next season, with several comedy pilots already picked up.

ABC has been one of the more aggressive networks in getting development ready for next season, having ordered comedies “Women Are Crazy” and “Awkward Situations for Men.”

Jim Motavalli 


Except from full article:


Find out where the hottest opportunities lie in clean technology, conservation, alternative energy, pollution mitigation and more.

In a generally bleak employment picture, the green jobs sector is growing faster than any other. By 2007, a Pew Charitable Trusts report on the Clean Energy Economy counted 770,000 jobs in all 50 states that met the "double bottom line" of economic growth and environmental sustainability. Clean energy economy jobs grew by 9.1% between 1998 and 2007, compared to just 3.7% in overall job growth in those years (before the markets crashed). Venture capital investment -- thin on the ground throughout the economy now -- totaled $12.6 billion in the clean tech sector between 2006 and 2009.

A new report from the Global Climate Network (composed of nine think tanks, including the Center for American Progress) predicts that the world's eight leading economies will create 20 million new jobs between now and 2020. In the U.S., the report said, the stimulus package and the American Clean Energy and Security Act could help create as many as 1.9 million new green jobs in the period. The move to a "smart grid" could create 270,000 jobs, and a further 138,000 if U.S. smart grid technologies are exported to a global market, the report said.

On the downside, a study from King Juan Carlos University in Madrid, Spain says that for every job created with energy price supports, 2.2 are lost in other industries. According to Gabriel Calzada, an economics professor at the university, each Spanish green job cost $774,000.

But PRTM global management consultants takes issue with that conclusion, explaining that jobs building green energy and electric vehicles are part of a global race. "The rest of the world is not going to wait when it comes to EVs and green energy, and jobs will be created somewhere," said PRTM's Oliver Hazimeh, who heads the firm's global e-mobility practice. "If the U.S. doesn't capture these jobs, then they may be lost to other markets, which could lead to a result similar to what occurred in Spain."

The federal stimulus bill contained more than $30 billion for clean energy, and the mantra espoused by now-deposed green jobs czar Van Jones was that the new positions should go to freshly trained Americans from some of the hardest-hit jobless populations. With unemployment over 10%, people need to go where the jobs are, and some states -- and some cities -- are making out better than others as the green jobs phenomenon unfolds. While every state and most American cities have a piece of the new economy, here are the five cities that -- through a combination of federal, state and municipal programs -- are faring best.

According to the Pew report, 65% of the national clean energy jobs in 2007 went to conservation and pollution mitigation -- by far the largest category. Clean energy accounted for 11.6% of new jobs in the period, energy efficiency for 9.5%, environmentally friendly production 7%, and training and support 6.8%. But environmentally friendly production saw the most growth: Up 67% from 1998 to 2007 (followed by clean energy, up 23%).

Of the top 10 clean-tech employers around the world identified by Clean Edge, four are in the U.S. (in Illinois, Washington, Arkansas and California). Clean Edge defines the top five sectors for clean-tech jobs in the U.S. as (in descending order): solar, biofuels and biomaterials, conservation and efficiency, smart grid and wind power. There's a long way to go. Only in Oregon are green jobs more than one percent of total employment (and it's only 1.02% of the 1.9 million jobs there).

Detroit

The Motor City makes few Top Ten lists. Its vaunted monorail goes practically nowhere, its downtown is still struggling, and political turmoil at City Hall -- added to daunting budgetary constraints -- has kept civic progress at a minimum. But help is on the way, in the form of federal Department of Energy green-tech grants that are funding factories and creating jobs to tap into the vast pool of skilled auto industry talent in the metropolitan area. The state had created more than 22,000 clean-tech jobs by 2007, but those numbers will jump impressively when the 2009 DOE funding puts spades in the ground.

Michigan did make one Top Ten list: It was number seven on a list of clean energy jobs compiled by Pew Charitable Trusts. Clean Edge identifies the green transportation sector as one of four growth areas, and that benefits the cluster of companies making hybrid and electric vehicles in the greater Detroit area. Even companies not based in Michigan -- such as California's Fisker Automotive and Ford battery car supplier Magna International -- have opened hubs near Detroit. A mechanical engineer working on plug-in hybrids and EVs can expect to make $63,600 median pay with a bachelor's degree, reports Clean Edge. A great example of what's happening in the Rust Belt is the transformation of the Ford Motor Company plant in Wixom, Michigan from a shuttered eyesore that had lost 1,500 jobs to an incubator for Xtreme Power (which makes power systems for wind and solar) and Clairvoyant Energy (solar).

A posting on available green jobs in the Detroit is here.

Michigan lost 3.6% of its jobs between 1998 and 2007, but clean jobs were a bright spot: Some 1,932 new clean businesses were started, offering 22,674 jobs. Some $55 million in venture capital was invested between 2006 and 2008. The state was 10th in the nation in adding new jobs in conservation and pollution mitigation in 2007.

Jeremy Korzeniewski
Autoblog Green




Jay Leno – in his traditional jeans and jean shirt, of course – has just had the opportunity to park a pre-production Chevy Volt in his Big Dog Garage, and he's kindly shared the experience with his fans. Right off the bat, Jay likens the future-tech Volt to a 1916 Owens Magnetic that operates on the exact same principle, proving that all good ideas eventually have their day in the sun on the road.

Leno has some interesting questions for Volt Chief Engineer Andrew Farah that are likely to be on the minds of regular shoppers who may consider the Volt for their next new car at the end of 2010. He also like the car's high-tech, lightweight stick... watch the video to see what we mean.

Naturally, Jay eventually takes the Volt out for a spin, and from what we can tell, he came away impressed. Somehow, Leno ends up talking about the Mazda Miata and wristwatches and why men should buy the Volt... or something like that. Anyway, hit the jump to watch the video and see Jay's reaction to the 2011 Chevy Volt. Thanks for the tip, MIikael W!

















ESPN

New Karate Kid Movie: Eye Spy The Lions Jersey


Detroit,MI
The New Republic
by Jennifer Bradley

Tuesday’s New York Times brings some unexpected but welcome news from Detroit: newly elected city council members are talking about the urgency of regional action.

"We need a higher standard of ethics and transparency and competence and cooperation, not just with each other but with our region and our state," says Charles Pugh, city council president-elect. His colleague Saunteel Jenkins makes the critical link between the region's crushing burden of segregation and the lack of cross-border cooperation: "One of the things that's very distracting about this region is that it is one of the most segregated areas in the country — much of what we've done in the public policy arena has been based on perceptions formed by our 1967 race riots. We want to form much more cooperative relationships."

The ability to act as a region, rather than a collection of separate and suspicious fiefdoms, is critical to Detroit's future. Regions that are fragmented and decentralized are less competitive than more cooperative regions, and have a harder time sustaining their economic strength. Researchers believe that a high degree of fragmentation makes it difficult for regions to adapt to new competitive challenges. If there was ever a region that needed all the help it could get in adjusting to a very different competitive landscape, it's Detroit.

The TNR article that I wrote a few weeks ago with Bruce Katz about how to revive Detroit noted that European cities that were in similarly disastrous straits after years of industrial decline had made regional engagement a key element of their recovery strategies. We recommended that Detroit seek out its own regional strategies. Even commentators who saw some shortcomings in our proposals agreed that engagement at the larger metropolitan level was vital.

The gap between what elected officials hope to do and what they actually can do is a vast one that has swallowed up many promising proposals. But if Detroit's incoming council members and reformist mayor Dave Bing can follow through and reach out to the surrounding suburbs — and if the surrounding suburbs, which are also engulfed by the auto industry's collapse, can overcome their own fears and stereotypes and respond to the city's overtures, the region will be a big step closer to stability and eventual recovery.

Tomorrow from 11 a.m. – 1 p.m., everyone’s favorite fuzzy mascot, PAWS, will cheer on not just the Detroit Tigers, but The Salvation Army of Metro Detroit.

 PAWS, in all his orange and black glory, will serve as a special celebrity Red Kettle Bell Ringer at Macy’s at Twelve Oaks Mall, using his mascot status to serve up some needed team spirit and raise money for The Salvation

Army’s Red Kettle Campaign. The public is welcome to come out, meet and take photos with PAWS, donate to his Red Kettle and help The Salvation Army reach its $7.8 million goal to help those in need right here in metro Detroit.

Macy’s at Twelve Oaks is located at 27550 Novi Rd. PAWS will be at the main entrance of Macy’s (outside) facing Novi Rd.

For more information about The Salvation Army, call 877-SAL-MICH or visit www.salmich.org.

Goodwill Detroit

In the spirit of Goodwill Industries of Greater Detroit’s ongoing efforts to help Metro Detroiters overcome challenges and secure new jobs, Goodwill Industries is encouraging members of the Metro Detroit community to show how they're helping others this holiday season through "Random Acts of Goodwill."

Through December 31, 2009, area residents can send photos, videos, voice recordings or a brief written summary of how they're giving back to others (individuals, families or organizations) this month to Goodwill Industries of Greater Detroit.  Submitted stories and other materials may be shared with Goodwill friends and supporters via the organization’s social media and Web properties. All submitters will automatically be entered to win prizes.

Goodwill Industries of Greater Detroit may also share these “random acts of goodwill” with the new members of Generation Goodwill, a youth leadership and community service organization to launch in January 2010, to inspire and motivate these young volunteers. Visit www.generationgoodwill.org to find out how you can nominate a young leader to become a Generation Goodwill founding member.

The smallest efforts can make a huge difference, so please share your stories with us by e-mailing materials to director@generationgoodwill.org by December 31, 2009*. Please put “Random Acts of Goodwill” in the subject line.

A random drawing for prizes, including an 8GB iPod Nano, Caribou Coffee gift certificates and bowling packages to Drakeshire Lanes in Farmington Hills, Mich., will take place in January 2010. Winners will be notified via e-mail.


Bailey Blog

Detroit in the Spotlight - Again!

The North American International Auto Show (NAIAS) is primed and ready to once again put Detroit in the global spotlight this upcoming January.

Once again, the New Year will begin with global automotive manufactures (OEMs) bringing major product announcements to Detroit for the world to see.  Entering its 22nd year as an international event, the show is among the most prestigious auto shows in the world and is one of the largest media events in North America.  The NAIAS 2010 has over 55 brands and companies set to exhibit, which is more than last year at this time.

Doug Fox, NAIAS Chairman says; “This show is the global forum where the positive momentum begins.  The innovation touted by the exhibitors, coupled with the addition of new features at NAIAS, sets the stage for the world.  Thousands of global journalists, government officials, visitors from around the world and the public, will see that momentum in motion.”  The reports already indicate that House Speaker Nancy Pelosi has confirmed that she will visit the show, and some even think that President Obama might make an appearance, we will just have to wait and see…

A dual approach of featuring alternative modes of motion will come together at NAIAS 2010 with the return of The Michigan Economic Development Corporation (MEDC) EcoXperience and the all-new Electric Avenue presented by The Dow Chemical Company.

These features will illustrate the practical and future applications of alterative fuel technologies from major manufacturers and suppliers, marking the return of such brands as Nissan and Mitsubishi to the NAIAS.

One of the best parts is that at the EcoXperience the general public will get the chance to drive the latest alternative fuel vehicles (Jan. 16 - 24).

This show always excites me and I am always most proud that Detroit, our city, is in the global center stage and is the site of the most business news of the day to start the year.

Detroit Peddling Produce Like Ice Cream


Associated Press

In a U.S. neighborhood served by 26 liquor stores but only one grocery, a community group is peddling fresh fruits and vegetables like ice cream.

Five days a week, the Peaches & Greens truck winds its way through the streets as a loudspeaker plays R&B and puts out the call: "Nutritious, delicious. Brought right to you. We have green and red tomatoes, white and sweet potatoes. We have greens, corn on the cob and cabbage, too."

The truck set up like a small market brings affordable produce to families on public assistance, homebound seniors and others who can't reach the well-stocked grocery chains in the suburbs.

"The truck delivery system is one that makes sense in Detroit because of the spread-out situation and the lack of transportation that reaches food venues," said Dave D. Weatherspoon, an associate professor at Michigan State University. "We thought that was a pretty good place to get started."

Peaches & Greens has community gardens, where volunteers grow greens, tomatoes and other vegetables to help stock the truck. The food also is offered at a neighborhood produce market, and organizers hope to persuade liquor stores and corner markets to stock their vegetables.

"People will buy it," said Lisa Johanon, executive director of the nonprofit Central Detroit Christian Community Development Corp., which runs Peaches & Greens. "We've seen the stereotype that urban communities won't eat healthy, and we're seeing that isn't true."
Associated Press

Houses with dreary urban facades covered in polka dots. A traveling dollhouse made from the remnants of abandoned homes. A dilapidated residence covered in ice.

Artists across the Detroit area are using the city's blight as their canvas, transforming abandoned homes into high-concept projects to draw attention to the homelessness, poverty and urban decay plaguing Detroit. They hope the ongoing experiment will shed some creatively inspired light on what Detroit was, is and could be again.

The work harks back to two decades ago when Tyree Guyton transformed a deteriorating Detroit neighborhood into a colorful, outdoor polka-dot art gallery.

Guyton rescued stuffed animals, sneakers and shopping carts from alleys and street corners and gave them a permanent home on the trees, houses and vacant lots of Heidelberg Street. But unlike Guyton's project, this latest wave of social art isn't centered on a single section of the city, and it comes at a time when the problems are just as dire, if not more so: Detroit has tens of thousands of abandoned structures, a budget deficit of at least $300 million and an unemployment rate two to three times that of the national average.

"It's amazing to see now the work that (Guyton) started 23 years ago kind of taking on shape and form in many different ways with many different people in this city," said Jenenne Whitfield, executive director of the Heidelberg Project.

Famous examples of social art include Spencer Tunick's photos depicting thousands of nude subjects at locations around the world, and Nek Chand's "Rock Garden," a vast sculpture garden in India. But the trend is magnified in Detroit because so many artists are zeroing in on the same subject matter and displaying their creations in high-profile ways.

Clinton Snider is one of those who saw artistic possibilities in Detroit's misfortune. The suburban Bloomfield Township resident typically expresses himself through painting. But these days, he's becoming known as the guy who built a miniature house from the remnants of abandoned homes.

Snider's creation — called House 365 — is touring the area with each "deedholder" hosting the little (about 5 feet tall) wood-framed house for a month at a time. It's currently booked into the middle of next year.

The house, which some mistake for a dollhouse, has become "a symbol for Detroit culture and how much abandonment there is," said Snider, who initially envisioned moving the house every day of the year, hence the name.

Marisa Gaggino, owner of The Heritage Co. II Architectural Artifacts, says she's honored to host Snider's artwork, in part because it symbolizes what she says is the "shocking" economic divide between Detroit and neighboring Oakland County, which houses her business and some of the most affluent communities in the U.S.

Gaggino acknowledges, though, that not all who visit her Royal Oak store grasp the meaning behind the miniature house that sits outside just beyond the entrance.

"The first people that looked at it came in and wanted to know how much it was," she said. "They thought it would be great to put in their backyard and have it as a playhouse for their little girl."

Richard Gage, who owns a Detroit-area architectural sculpture studio and helped foster the House 365 project, says Snider's work elicits many different reactions.

"A lot of people think it's talking exclusively about the current economic situation in Detroit. That's a big percentage of it, but that's not the only thing," Gage said. "Other people have talked about an opportunity for renewal. I had one guy call who was really excited about it but mad that we didn't do it on a big house."

It's unlikely those who see the project planned by New York-based photographer Gregory Holm and architect Matthew Radune will mistake it for anything beyond what it is. They are going to freeze an abandoned home in Detroit this winter, encasing it in ice.

Their goal is to draw attention to the widespread foreclosure problem in the region. They call it Ice House Detroit.

In the spring, crews will salvage what building materials can be reused and demolish the home. The lot will be donated, probably for a community garden.

Other examples of Detroit's growing social art movement include a series of crumbling Detroit houses painted bright orange; the exterior of a building along one of the city's main drags covered in mirror shards and striking colors; and a couple who bought a rundown home for a song and are recruiting artists from around the world to buy foreclosed houses in the neighborhood and rebuild.

Even as social art becomes more common around Detroit, Guyton still is as passionate about his work on Heidelberg Street as he's ever been.

On a recent weekday, with nary a soul around, he was in his element, listening to the radio and working on his latest creations. Guyton spent some time painting an abstract piece, then wandered about, searching for pieces of junk he could transform into art. He settled on a rusted-out car hood and took his paint brush to it.

A minivan pulled up, and its occupants stopped to ask Guyton about Heidelberg and what it all means.

As the vehicle pulled away, Guyton smiled, pleased to know his life's work still is provoking curiosity.

"That's what it's all about," he said.

Under The Radar - Michigan



Under The Radar is a fast paced, modern, new television program that explores all of Michigan.

This show will bring weekly audiences high quality programming from award winning producers about all the cool people, places, and things to do in Michigan.

Find Under the Radar on YouTube and Facebook

American Express today announced the opening of "Members Lounge" at Somerset Collection South in Troy, Mich. Available to American Express Cardmembers through Dec. 27, Members Lounge will provide a relaxing and rejuvenating escape from the crowds for hurried and harried shoppers who have yet to finish their holiday shopping.

Cardmembers can refresh and recharge in the tranquil space, where they can enjoy a coat check, complimentary beverages, including Starbucks coffee and Godiva cookies. Cardmembers can also take advantage of iPod and phone charging stations and complimentary gift-wrapping services for up to three gifts per person.

As a special token of appreciation for the Detroit residents, who recently made the switch to the Delta SkyMiles Credit Card from American Express, they will receive a special gift item when they visit the Members Lounge, while supplies last.

"At American Express, we are constantly striving to turn everyday activities into extraordinary experiences for our Cardmembers," says David Rabkin, vice president, Delta Co-Brand Portfolio, American Express.  "We want Detroit residents to know that when you become an American Express Cardmember, you get much more than the benefits and features that come with the Card, you get access to valuable perks and privileges.  We're pleased to partner with Somerset Collection South, one of the best shopping destinations in the country, to offer our Cardmembers a holiday shopping oasis."

"Each holiday season our guests look forward to the wonderful amenities offered by Somerset Collection and our retailers," said Linda McIntosh, director of marketing for Somerset Collection. "From our lavish holiday décor and extended opening hours, to special shopping events and our concierge services, those who've been shopping with us for decades or first time visitors expect a luxurious, comfortable atmosphere. Naturally, the American Express Members Lounge is the perfect complement to all that we're doing here at Somerset."

The Members Lounge will be open during the Somerset Collection's holiday hours through Sunday, Dec. 27, and is located on the second floor of the shopping center on the south side near Saks.


Female bloggers from the local Detroit area are coming together this Winter Season, with PositiveDetroit.Net, in collaboration with Operation: Kid Equip, to provide at least 25% of Oakland County Schools with dictionaries for third graders.


Erin Rose of Positive Detroit, Becks Davis of Detroit Moxie, Nikki Stephan of  Creativity, Love, Happiness & All That Falls Between , Jennifer Wright of Looking Glass Laneand Lauren Weber of Staircase to Earth's Loveliness all spend much of their time writing for their respective blogs and want to help give the same opportunities to local students as they were given in their writing classes as children.  They want to help our local students become better writers.

With the assistance of Operation: Kid Equip and its participation with The Dictionary Project, we will be distributing dictionaries specifically written for third graders who are at the dividing line between learning to read and reading to learn.


Now, through March 15, 2010, we are raising money to provide roughly 2,700 third graders in Oakland County with brand new dictionaries. To give you an idea of the impact you can make, for a $20 donation, you can supply at least 8 third graders with dictionaries.

An anonymous donor has graciously offered to match donations, dictionary-for-dictionary, up to the first 100 dictionaries. Can you just see the excitement on their faces and hear the kids when they receive these gifts?  Just think, your donation today, can double the amount of children that are being served tomorrow.




As the founder of Positive Detroit, I feel very strongly about our local area children and their education, especially when it comes to the written word.  The ability to write proficiently is a skill that enhances every aspect of one’s life, from writing a thank you note, putting the finishing touches on a resume, to having the ability to write an Oscar winning screen play.  As a child, I remember a beautifully leather bound set consisting of a series of specialized dictionaries and a thesaurus that sat on a table in the family room of my parent’s house.  These were my go-to books from the time I was in 4th grade until I graduated from high school.  With those tools, I enjoyed writing and saw it as powerful channel of self expression.




Here is how you can help:

1. Click Here to make a PayPal donation for $100, $50, $20 or $10

2. Mail a check payable to:

Operation: Kid Equip
PO Box 364
Royal Oak, MI  48068-0364

Be sure to write Dictionary Project in the memo line.

3. Contact menachem@operationkidequip.org to make a credit card or
other form of payment outside of PayPal.

4. If you would like to join the female bloggers collaboration
with your blog, contact Erin Rose at positivedetroit@gmail.com.

About Operation: Kid Equip
As an all-volunteer 501(c)(3) nonprofit community benefit organization, we realize that to break the cycle of poverty and hopelessness, we have to meet some very basic, yet overlooked needs. Operation: Kid Equip acts as a conduit for collecting and distributing tangible educational and school supplies to school-aged children. Operation: Kid Equip effects long term improvement in the community by providing at-risk kids with the core necessities they need to prosper in school and in life. Visit our website at www.operationkidequip.org

About The Dictionary Project
The Dictionary Project is a 501(c)(3) nonprofit organization. The goal of this program is to assist all students in completing the school year as good writers, active readers and creative thinkers by providing students with their own personal dictionary. The dictionaries are a gift to each student to use at school and at home for years to come.




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