Metro Detroit's Campbell-Ewald Advertising Agency won 17 awards and was name the winner of Time Inc.'s "Selling Detroit" ad campaign contest at the third annual D Show advertising awards event on December 2.

The D Show Awards recognize the “best of the best” creative work of Detroit-based agencies and clients. Campbell-Ewald's work was honored with the following awards:

Ambassador Award — honoring the effective marriage of content creativity and context innovation — for U.S. Navy's NavyAthletes.com and NavyForMoms Paint the Town Blue campaigns.

Two Best of Category Awards for Kaiser Permanente’s When I Grow Up (Best of TV category) and NavyAthletes.com Integrated Campaign (Best of Integrated Branding category).

14 D Awards recognizing the agency's diverse capabilities and honoring the work on behalf of five clients in the following categories:




TV: Chevrolet, Kaiser Permanente, U.S. Postal Service
Out of Home: Kaiser Permanente
Radio: OnStar
Digital Media: Chevrolet, U.S. Navy
Innovative Use of Media: Kaiser Permanente
Integrated Campaigns: Kaiser Permanente, U.S. Navy

In addition to the award wins, Campbell-Ewald was named the winner among five competing agencies of Time Inc.'s "Selling Detroit" ad campaign contest.

The D Show brings the Detroit advertising and marketing community together to celebrate the breadth of ideas, the depth of talent, and the craft of the product. The awards event, a production of the D Council (the Adcraft Club of Detroit committee that oversees the judging and presentation of the awards) was held at the Max M. Fisher Music Center in Detroit and was attended by over 700 people.



On December 13th, Live to Give Foundation and Bottomless Toy Chest are bringing together a selected group of 6 families that have been touched by cancer for an afternoon of stress-free holiday fun. It will be a time for these families to forget the hardships that they are going through and enjoy an afternoon of surprises.

We had so many people ask how to get involved last Holiday Season, that we came more prepared this year and the results after just two days are awesome! We would like to extend an invitation to you to help us in our mission of personally touching the lives of these local families. Please read below and visit the front page of our website (http:/livetogivefoundation.org) for more information on how you can get involved.

OPTIONS:


1) Make a Video Shout Out
How: Create a 10-20 second video dedicated towards wishing a family a happy holiday
Contact: Kelly; kelly.doyle@livetogivefoundation.org
When: By Wednesday, Dec. 9
Link: http://livetogivefoundation.org/families/bottomless-toy-chest/make-a-video-shout-out/

2) Donate A Stocking Program
How: Either (i) donate a stocking by writing a $30 check to "Live to Give Foundation" and we will use the money to create a stocking on your behalf or (ii) personalize your own stocking by buying your own gifts, designing the look, writing a personal message, etc.
Contact: Shikha; shikha.mehta@livetogivefoundation.org.
When: By Wednesday, Dec. 9
Link: http://livetogivefoundation.org/families/bottomless-toy-chest/donate-a-stocking/

3) Sponsor a Family
How: Sponsor a family by donating a big family present, a single gift per family member and other family needs found on a wish list.
Contact: Kevin; kevin.smith@livetogivefoundation.org.
When: By Dec. 5
Link: http://livetogivefoundation.org/families/bottomless-toy-chest/sponsor-a-family/


A final note: Video Shout Outs will be given to families and posted on our website (unless you ask otherwise) and stocking donators/family sponsors will get personalized videos and pictures mailed back by Christmas so they are able to connect with the family they helped. This is going to be our largest family event to date and we plan on making it profoundly personal for YOU as well!


While the weather outside is frightful, the tea room inside Edsel & Eleanor Ford House is always a warm, cozy spot at Christmastime for friends and families to sip and savor an afternoon together.

Listen and learn how Edsel and Eleanor Ford and their four children spent Christmastime in their home with a Holiday Tea and Tour at Edsel & Eleanor Ford House. Holiday Tea and Tour dates are Dec. 5, 12 and 19, with seating at 3 p.m.

The afternoon begins with a tour of Ford House, followed by delectable sandwiches, delicate pastries and delightful teas at the estate’s Activities Center.

Holiday Teas and Tours are $35 per person and include a limited edition 80th anniversary keepsake ornament. Call (313) 884-4222 to make a reservation.

Downtown Milford Decks the Holidays in Style


Christmas Open House celebrates the season with Dickens-inspired event on Dec. 3

When the cold wind blows and the snow begins falling, the quaint village of Milford is magically transformed into a winter wonderland filled with unique shops and restaurants. On Thursday, Dec. 3, get in the spirit of the season when you are transported in time to Milford’s annual Christmas Open House, a Dickens-inspired celebration, to be held in downtown Milford from 5:45 to 9 p.m.

“Milford is a beautiful downtown destination – especially during the holidays,” said Ann Barnette, executive director of the Milford Downtown Development Authority. “We invite visitors to come to the village to experience an old-fashioned Christmas celebration, while choosing to shop local. Our retailers and restaurants have something for all budgets and tastes.”

Choir groups from the local schools and strolling musicians will walk the streets singing holiday songs throughout the evening and Santa Claus will arrive at 6 p.m. on a fire truck to spread holiday cheer in Center Street Park.

Open House visitors are welcome to bring a canned/dry food donation for local nonprofit, Huron Valley Community Sharing. Upon donation, they will receive a candle that will light the way during the festive holiday caroling.

To top off the night, visitors can check out the unique shops and restaurants located downtown. Many stores will be open until 9 p.m. and will be offering special discounts and refreshments to customers.

Getting To Milford

The Village of Milford is a 2.5 square mile area nestled in southwest Oakland County and is easily accessed from both I-96 and M-59.

For more information about visiting Milford, please visit www.meetmeinmilford.com


As temperatures cool and autumn leaves fall, the large-scale indoor healing garden at Henry Ford West Bloomfield Hospital remains lush and green with shoots of new growth.  Completed only 7 months ago by interior landscape firm Planterra, the adjoining Main and Quiet Atriums will provide a unique oasis for patients during its first winter.


“Plants bring nature inside the building, so even in the off season our community can still come here and be connected to nature, and really take advantage of its healing affects,” says Gerard Van Grinsven, CEO of Henry Ford Hospital West Bloomfield.

The gardens were designed to maximize its therapeutic benefits, providing natural views to inpatient rooms, year-round walking paths, natural privacy screening and utilization of specific plants that were selected to optimize air quality.  “These gardens are important to me professionally but also personally, as a flower child from the baby boom generation I know that when I require medical treatment, I need my chlorophyll fix.  I feel most healthy when I am surrounded by plants,” says Larry Pliska, President of Planterra and designer of the interior landscaping at Henry Ford West Bloomfield.

The planted atriums are part of Henry Ford West Bloomfield’s overall commitment to create a center of wellness, offering healthy lifestyle education and natural therapies within a mainstream medical setting.

In just two days in October, Fashion In Detroit left an indelible mark on Michigan, proving once and for all that cutting edge fashion is alive and well in the Midwest and our creative community, too, deserves national notice.

The high style event shows no signs of stopping. Organizers have announced the second Fashion In Detroit events are set for Friday-Saturday, March 19-20 at Shed 3 in Detroit’s Eastern Market.

Set to rival more established Fashion Week events in such stylish cities as New York and Los Angeles, Fashion In Detroit drew a crowd of more than 1,000 on Oct. 1-2, to the Detroit Zoo, in Royal Oak, Mich. Related events like the elegant AfterGlow welcomed more than 1,200 people. Fashion In Detroit provided more than $16,000 in cash and in-kind donations to local charities and non-profit organizations – all in the name of fashion.

“We did what we set out to do,” said Karen Buscemi, host of Fashion In Detroit and a member of the executive committee. “We put Detroit on the map as a place to go for fashion.”

Fashion In Detroit achieved its goal of spotlighting Michigan talent and breaking the boundaries of a primarily automotive manufacturing past. This came as little surprise to the event’s creators, a team comprised of Detroit’s heaviest hitters in fashion, beauty and event management.

Those executive committee members are Project Runway’s Joe Faris, a Troy resident; Leslie Ann Pilling, president of Presence II Productions and Leslie Ann Pilling Design; Rino Marra, owner of Birmingham’s FIGO salon; Karen Buscemi, editor of StyleLine magazine; Lians Jadan, international fashion photographer and co-owner of LM Studios; and K’Kio Hardin, international designer/art director.

“Fashion in Detroit has elevated the standards for all fashion shows here in Michigan,” said Rino Marra. “It has really made an impact on the entire fashion community here. We plan to keep that momentum going and to surpass the high standards we set in October during our second event in March.”

By moving Fashion In Detroit within Detroit’s city limits, the event stands to embrace the Motor City in an even more profound way.

Fashion in Detroit will again donate a portion of the proceeds from ticket sales to a local charity. This time around the recipient is Forgotten Harvest. And a local designer will receive a grant to participate in the show.

Developing an Endgame at the DIA: From the Detroit Stories


Lester Sloan
Huffington Post


Last week, 750 Detroiters turned out at the city's signature museum, the Detroit Institute of Arts (DIA) to bear witness and raise cash for the 124-year-old institution, and honor philanthropist A. Alfred Taubman. It was a harmonious blending of blue bloods and blue collars coming together among the many treasures housed there. The DIA is the fifth largest museum in America, and has one of the largest and most significant art collections in the United States.

The Richard Avedon exhibition was an eye-popping collection of colorful, mostly black and white images produced over the 50-year career of the world's greatest fashion photographer. For fashion buffs and lovers of photography alike, it is a walk down memory lane, for both the models and the themes are familiar to many of those who came out for the event. The iconic image of the show is that of Donyale Luna, an African-American woman from Detroit. Avedon was both an innovative artist and social commentator, and with Luna, he helped to break the color line in fashion. One of his earliest books and social statements was in collaboration with a high school friend, James Baldwin, entitled "Nothing Personal."

For my money, however, one of the best events at the DIA takes place every Friday night in Prentis Court, one level down from the Diego Rivera's "Detroit Industry" frescos. There one can witness not images from the past, but an event that speaks to the future of Detroit: dozens of children, mostly African-American, hovering over chess boards, young minds being shaped for greatness. The DIA provides a place for those interested in honing their chess skills with a place to go, but then, after all, it's their museum too.

The idea of teaching chess to these young minds is the brainchild of Kevin Fite, a math teacher at the city's Washington Parks Academy. He started the Detroit City Chess Club in 2003. When one of his students moved on to high school and asked "where are we going to play chess now, Mr. Fite?" he went looking for a spot. He landed at Skillman Library, the downtown branch of the Detroit Public Library where he and his students felt right at home. "They even let my kids bring lunch into the library," he recalls with a smile. "They hosted trophy ceremonies, ordered books on chess and made them available to the youngsters."

When construction of the CompuWare headquarters in downtown Detroit resulted in the temporary closing of the Skillman library, the DIA made the Prentis Court facility available to Fite and his growing roster of emerging chess masters.

Since its inception, the Detroit City Chess Club has produced National, State and City champions, competing in matches in Sacramento, Denver, Nashville, Louisville, Chicago, Windsor and Montreal. Besides learning the strategies of the game, these youngsters are also learning life skills: "Chess is life," says 17-year-old Kayeen Ellis-Kemp, "you have to think before you act." He was taught to play the game by an uncle before coming under the tutelage of Fite.

A self-avowed gifted basketball player, Ellis-Kemp is also the 2006 and 2007 National chess champ. He aspires to be more like Maurice Ashley, the first black grand master, than Kobe Bryant, though he credits chess with improving his court gamesmanship. He also credits chess with bringing up his grades, raising his average from 2.0 to 3.6. "You can get a scholarship for chess," he offers. "Not many people know that."

At a recent gathering at the DIA, Ellis-Kemp received as many high 5's for his report card (5 A's and 1 C) as he did for his chess skills. He quickly explains that the lower grade was the result of a late enrollment in one of his classes, and would soon be replaced by an A. College is in his future, and he hopes to get a degree in sports management. "It's not what you say, but what you do," he says, spinning a Fite maxim.

Eleven-year-old Sidnei Austin has only been playing for three years and already she's 24th in the nation; she was rated 6th in the State in 2008. She says chess has helped her in math and in general. She has always been an A and B student, with a few slips now and then, but as she puts it, her grades "stay strong." Chess has improved her concentration and she agrees with Ellis-Kemp that it's a lot like life: "You have your difficulties that you have to go through; you overcome them and then you win or loose. That's life."

At this gathering, Fite's matches with the kids are often interrupted by his cell phone: concerned parents checking on the whereabouts of a child. "He's here," or "she can't come to the phone right now, she's playing." But on any given Friday, there are more parents in the courtyard than on the phone.

Tim Woods, a doting father watches his 5-year-old son Cameron play a game against himself. He tries to bring him down every other week.


"He's constantly asking me: 'when are we going to the DIA?'"

"Can you beat him?" I inquire, pointing to his budding chess master.

"Just for a minute" is his response, "but give him a year or two and he'll be teaching me."

His 11-year-old son, Austin, is involved in a game nearby.

Woods is conscious of the impact that the young chess players has had on others:

"Every non-African-American that walks by seems so shocked, smiling and taking pictures. Kevin Fite has done a wonderful job of bringing this club along. All I can do is clap my hands for him."

The proud dad can't say enough about Kevin Fite: "He's doing a wonderful job with these kids. Visitors to the museum walk through this court and can't believe their eyes."

Many of them, myself included, hover between the tables taking pictures.

In conjunction with a renovation plan that ended two years ago, Director Graham Beal has found ways to make the museum experience more meaningful to gallery visitors of all ages. Among the highlights are new interactive elements like video projections, and an installation that allows visitors to put themselves into paintings. "Please touch" labels encourage youngsters to tactically explore items in the museum. There are special audio tours for children, as well as galleries that group objects of art by theme instead of by date.

From my observations, the Detroit City Chess Club's presence at the DIA goes a long way toward increasing the frequency of visits by a segment of the community that may not have been there before. Perhaps one unintended consequence is that when the kids are not playing chess, they are sometimes off with their parents exploring the museum. This is a plus in a city that is dogged in the media for being at war with itself. How appropriate that within the walls of the DIA, the rebirth of our city is taking place.

Karen Nettles is a single parent with a chess and tennis phenom in tow. Her nine-year-old son Jibril already has his sights set on, first, a career in tennis, followed by a career in medicine. He plans to go to Yale University, following in the footsteps of a chess pro who won a scholarship because of his prowess in the game. Jabril is well aware of the difficulties that lie ahead, but the straight-A student, who loves to read biographies because they deal with real people who overcame real challenges, has his eyes on the prize and is willing to work hard to reach his goals.

One of the greatest wonders is to witness what develops when mind and spirit come together in the emerging personality of a young child. The great Greek historian and classicist Edith Hamilton says it best: "...both belong to the part of us which in Platonic phraseology, draws us up from that which is ever dragging down, or in the figure which Plato is fondest of, that which gives form to the formless."

While we pay tribute with our hearts and cameras to Fite and his students, we the citizens of Detroit should take a moment to applaud ourselves. And visiting journalists should take note that these moments of renewal occur every day at the Charles Wright, The Detroit Historical, and The Museum of Science amidst the rubble that can obstruct clear vision. These institutions are a source of our pride.
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